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Expand chart
Data: Indeed; Chart: Naema Ahmed/Axios

The vast majority of Americans are still living in cities and states where there aren't enough jobs for the unemployed.

The big picture: The jobs landscape is improving — but not quickly enough, according to data on job postings from Indeed's Hiring Lab.

"The rate of improvement since August is disappointing compared to the more dramatic improvement we saw in May, June and July," says Jed Kolko, chief economist at Indeed.

  • States with big cities are suffering more than those that are more rural because cities rely on restaurant, retail and hotel jobs. And Hawaii and D.C. are in the worst shape because of the decline of domestic and international tourism.
  • Some states' job postings appear to have bounced back and are nearly on par with 2019 levels, but postings don't tell the whole story, says Kolko. Employment is down in every single state, per the latest Bureau of Labor Statistics data.

The bottom line: "Even though each wave of the virus has affected different regions of the country, the economic pain has been fairly consistent," Kolko says. "The places with bigger drops in job postings and steeper job losses over the summer remain the places further behind today."

Go deeper

Erica Pandey, author of @Work
Nov 24, 2020 - World

Remote work shakes up geopolitics

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

The global adoption of remote work may leave the rising powers in the East behind.

The big picture: Despite India's and China's economic might, these countries have far fewer remote jobs than the U.S. or Europe. That's affecting the emerging economies' resilience amid the pandemic.

Trump's 2024 begins

Trump speaking to reporters in the White House on Thanksgiving. Photo: Erin Schaff - Pool/Getty Images

President Trump is likely to announce he'll run again in 2024, perhaps before this term even ends, sources tell Axios.

Why it matters: Trump has already set in motion two important strategies to stay relevant and freeze out other Republican rivals. 

Caitlin Owens, author of Vitals
47 mins ago - Health

Nursing homes are still getting pummeled by the pandemic

Data: AHCA/NCAL, The COVID Tracking Project; Chart: Naema Ahmed/Axios

The U.S. has gotten no better at keeping the coronavirus out of nursing homes.

Why it matters: The number of nursing home cases has consistently tracked closely with the number of cases in the broader community — and that's very bad news as overall cases continue to skyrocket.