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Expand chart
Data: Indeed; Chart: Naema Ahmed/Axios

The vast majority of Americans are still living in cities and states where there aren't enough jobs for the unemployed.

The big picture: The jobs landscape is improving — but not quickly enough, according to data on job postings from Indeed's Hiring Lab.

"The rate of improvement since August is disappointing compared to the more dramatic improvement we saw in May, June and July," says Jed Kolko, chief economist at Indeed.

  • States with big cities are suffering more than those that are more rural because cities rely on restaurant, retail and hotel jobs. And Hawaii and D.C. are in the worst shape because of the decline of domestic and international tourism.
  • Some states' job postings appear to have bounced back and are nearly on par with 2019 levels, but postings don't tell the whole story, says Kolko. Employment is down in every single state, per the latest Bureau of Labor Statistics data.

The bottom line: "Even though each wave of the virus has affected different regions of the country, the economic pain has been fairly consistent," Kolko says. "The places with bigger drops in job postings and steeper job losses over the summer remain the places further behind today."

Go deeper

Updated Dec 23, 2020 - Axios Events

Reskilling America: The path for post-pandemic job recovery

Learning new skills will be essential for many Americans who lost jobs as a result of COVID-19, since many of the jobs will not be returning. But not everyone can reskill the traditional way.

Why it’s important: To thrive in a rapidly changing job market, American workers will have to rethink their approach to skills and work.

As one expert at Google’s Powering Economic Opportunity: New Pathways to Job Recovery event put it: Job seekers must now be life-long learners.

At the event, policy makers, local government, nonprofit leaders and other experts talked about how they can pool resources and work together to better prepare American workers for today’s job market.

Their top three solutions:

  • Expand access to free or nearly free digital tools and training, like Grow with Google’s free digital training and resources.
  • Develop online courses and certificates — like Google Career Certificates — and a way to scale these offerings to communities that need it most to train a more equitable workforce
  • Encourage life-long learning and make reskilling resources more accessible to people.

According to Grow with Google VP Lisa Gevelber, “For years, Google has supported digital skilling programs and created pathways to help people secure good-paying jobs. Accessible job-training solutions will help people get hired into jobs that will be most relevant in the post-pandemic economy."

What this means: Companies are developing digital tools and programs that help people better understand the digital world, job skills training, and career certificates that job seekers can use to pursue in-demand, better-wage careers.

Oftentimes, these companies partner with governments, nonprofits and higher education institutions to help bridge the gap.

  • One example: Grow with Google offers digital tools and training to people looking to start new jobs or careers.

    Google’s online Career Certificates prepare people with no experience for jobs in high-growth, high-paying fields including IT Support, User Experience (UX) Design, and Data Analytics in 3-6 months with no degree required.

Key numbers: “We have over 400,000 people enrolled in these programs already, and a hundred employers across America who are hiring the certificate graduates. Top companies in retail, entertainment and finance, and, of course, Google,” Gevelber said.

Even more, Grow with Google has partnered with Jobs for the Future (JFF) to help bring these career certificates to over a hundred community colleges around the U.S.

The impact: Students across Illinois and Alabama “really see their job prospects increase after completing a certificate,” said Maria Flynn, president and CEO of Jobs of the Future.

  • One Ohio student who listed her certificate credentials online has received five times more searches per week and several interview invitations.

When asked how local governments can get involved, Flynn suggested “expanding access to high-quality, short-term credentials like the Google certificate.” This helps meet the urgent need to reskill workers as well as the longer-term needs for creating better quality jobs.”

The takeaway: Making certificates, and other alternative career pathways, more accessible opens up a world where it’s easier for people to reskill for a new career – or a lifetime.

What Google is saying:

“What we are seeing on a positive note is how resilient Americans are, and we're seeing them put technology to work.”

– Lisa Gevelber, Vice President, Grow with Google

Learn more.

Updated Dec 23, 2020 - Axios Events

1. First things first: The importance of lifelong learning

Lisa Gevelber, Founder and VP of Grow with Google, and the president and CEO of Jobs of the Future, Maria Flynn, at Google's virtual Powering Economic Opportunity: New Pathways to Job Recovery event.

Want a job in the future? If so, experts at Google’s recent Powering Economic Opportunity: New Pathways to Job Recovery event suggested that job seekers must do one thing: be a lifelong student.

Cuomo says words may have been "misinterpreted" following allegations of harassment

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo at a Feb. 22 news conference. Photo: Seth Wenig/pool/AF via Getty Images

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo issued a lengthy statement on Sunday saying he " never inappropriately touched anybody" but acknowledged that "some of the things I have said have been misinterpreted as an unwanted flirtation," after two of his former aides accused him of sexual harassment.

Why it matters: Prior to Cuomo's statement, in which he adds that he "never inappropriately touched anybody" or meant to make anyone uncomfortable, the governor's office and the state attorney general went back and forth in a public disagreement about how to investigate the allegations.