Apr 15, 2020 - Health

Jimmy Carter "distressed" by Trump's decision to withhold WHO funding

Photo: Scott Cunningham/Getty Images

Former President Jimmy Carter criticized President Trump's decision to withhold U.S. funding from the World Health Organization Wednesday, calling it "the only international organization capable of leading the effort to control the virus."

Why it matters: Carter dedicated his career to humanitarian work after leaving the presidency, establishing the Carter Center in 1982 with the goal of helping improve the quality of life for people in more than 80 countries. The 95-year-old is also active in Habitat for Humanity and won the Nobel Peace Prize in 2002.

What he's saying:

"I am distressed by the decision to withhold critically needed U.S. funding for the World Health Organization, especially during an international pandemic. WHO is the only international organization capable of leading the effort to control the virus."
— Jimmy Carter said in a statement

The big picture: Trump has faced widespread backlash for his decision to halt funding to the UN agency in the middle of the pandemic. He has insisted that the WHO mishandled the international response to the coronavirus outbreak and is "China-centric."

Go deeper: Jimmy Carter asks for Carter Center donations to be redirected for coronavirus relief

Go deeper

18 hours ago - Health

HHS requests data on race and ethnicity with coronavirus test results

A nurse writes a note as a team of doctors and nurses performs a procedure on a coronavirus patient in the Regional Medical Center on May 21 in San Jose, California. Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

The Department of Health and Human Services moved on Thursday to require that an individual's race, ethnicity, age and sex be submitted to the agency with novel coronavirus test results.

Why it matters: Some cities and states have reported the virus is killing black people at disproportionately high rates. There are gaps in the national picture of how many people of color are affected, since the data has not been a requirement for states to collect or disclose.

Where the CDC went wrong with its coronavirus response

Photo: Tami Chappell/AFP/Getty Images

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention mishandled the coronavirus pandemic, sowing mistrust among health experts and the public, according to a sweeping report by the New York Times.

Why it matters: It's been reported that a faster and more organized response from the federal government could have saved thousands of lives.

Updated 17 hours ago - Health

U.S. coronavirus updates

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins; Map: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios. This graphic includes "probable deaths" that New York City began reporting on April 14.

The Department of Health and Human Services moved on Thursday to require that an individual's race, ethnicity, age and sex be submitted to the agency with novel coronavirus test results.

Why it matters: Some cities and states have reported the virus is killing black people at disproportionately high rates. There are gaps in the national picture of how many people of color are affected, since the data has not been a requirement for states to collect or disclose.