Photo: Matt Stone/MediaNews Group/Boston Herald

JetBlue on Tuesday became the first major U.S. airline to announce it will require its passengers to wear face coverings in an effort to slow the spread of the coronavirus.

The big picture: Passengers will have to wear masks the entirety of the time from check-in to deplaning. Children who are too small to keep on a face mask are exempt from the policy, which will take effect on May 4.

  • Masks "should fit snugly against the side of the face, be secured with ties or ear loops, include multiple layers of fabric and allow for unrestricted breathing," JetBlue said in a press release.
  • The airline has already limited the number of passengers allowed on flights to help ensure social distancing.

What they're saying:

“Wearing a face covering isn’t about protecting yourself it’s about protecting those around you. This is the new flying etiquette. Onboard, cabin air is well circulated and cleaned through filters every few minutes but this is a shared space where we have to be considerate of others. We are also asking our customers to follow these CDC guidelines in the airport as well.”
— JetBlue COO Joanna Geraghty in a press release

Editor’s note: This post has been corrected to indicate that Joanna Geraghty is the COO of JetBlue (not CEO).

Go deeper

What to expect from the final debate of the 2020 election

Trump and Biden at the first debate. Morry Gash-Pool/Getty Image

Watch for President Trump to address Joe Biden as “the big guy” or “the chairman” at tonight's debate as a way of dramatizing the Hunter Biden emails. Hunter's former business partner Tony Bobulinski is expected to be a Trump debate guest.

The big picture: Trump's advisers universally view the first debate as a catastrophe — evidenced by a sharp plunge in Trump’s public and (more convincingly for them) private polling immediately following the debate.

Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

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Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

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  3. Economy: Why the stimulus delay isn't a crisis (yet).
  4. Health: FDA approves Gilead's remdesivir as a coronavirus treatment How the pandemic might endMany U.S. deaths were avoidable.
  5. Education: Boston and Chicago send students back home for online learning.
  6. World: Spain and France exceed 1 million cases.

FBI: Russian hacking group stole data after targeting local governments

FBI Headquarters. Photo: Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Energetic Bear, a Russian state-sponsored hacking group, has stolen data from two servers after targeting state and federal government networks in the U.S. since at least September, the FBI and Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency said on Thursday.

Driving the news: Director of National Intelligence John Ratcliffe announced Wednesday that Iran and Russia had obtained voter registration information that could be used to undermine confidence in the U.S. election system.