Attorney General Jeff Sessions. Photo: AAron Ontiveroz/The Denver Post via Getty Images

Responding to the recent Supreme Court ruling in favor of a Christian baker who refused to make a custom cake for a same-sex couple, Attorney General Jeff Sessions on Wednesday voiced his support for the ruling saying, "there are plenty of other people to bake that cake," and "we shouldn’t have to go to court to co-exist in peace."

The backdrop: Sessions has long been vocal advocate for religious freedom, and last October he issued a sweeping legal guidance urging religious liberty protections. His agency had also took the side of a cake shop.

"There is no need for the power of the government to be arrayed against an individual who is honestly attempting to live out—to freely exercise—his sincere religious beliefs and there are plenty of other people to bake that cake. ... Rather than trying to impose their views on others, people need to learn to be accepting of others and learn when to leave them alone."
— Sessions said in a speech to the Orthodox Union Advocacy Center's annual leadership mission

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