President Trump's personal lawyer Jay Sekulow said Sunday that — should the president decide not sit for an interview with special counsel Robert Mueller — his legal team would be prepared to fight any potential subpoena from Mueller's team in court.

The big picture: Sekulow told George Stephanopoulos on ABC's "This Week" that Trump has made it clear that he's willing to sit down with the special counsel, though his legal team still has some concerns. The team submitted a proposal to Mueller last month stating that the president would agree to an interview if questions are limited to potential Russian collusion, but Sekulow said the decision ultimately rests with Trump himself.

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Felix Salmon, author of Capital
Updated 52 mins ago - Economy & Business

Trump risk rises for companies

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Donald Trump fancies himself a businessman — and has given himself a central role in determining the conduct and even the existence of major companies both domestic and foreign.

Why it matters: America has historically been a great place to operate a company under the rule of law, and not be beholden to political whim. Those days seem to be over — at least for companies in the communications industry.

Ben Geman, author of Generate
Updated 52 mins ago - Energy & Environment

China's split personality on climate

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

A new insta-analysis of China's vow to achieve "carbon neutrality" before 2060 helps to underscore why Tuesday's announcement sent shockwaves through the climate and energy world.

Why it matters: Per the Climate Action Tracker, a research group, following through would lower projected global warming 0.2 to 0.3°C. That's a lot!

Cuomo: New York will conduct its own review of coronavirus vaccine

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo. Photo: Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D) said Thursday that the state will move forward with its own review process of coronavirus vaccines even if the Food and Drug Administration approves one or more for distribution and public use.

Why it matters: The motion could sow further public doubt that the federal government could release a vaccine based on political motives rather than safety and efficacy.

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