Tsunekazu Takeda. Photo: Charly Triballeua/AFP/Getty Images

Japan's Olympic Committee chief Tsunekazu Takeda, who is under investigation for suspected corruption, will step down when his term ends this summer and resign from the International Olympic Committee.

Why it matters: The ongoing corruption probe has further damaged the credibility of the Olympics bidding process, and Takeda's departure leaves a dark cloud hanging over next year's Summer Games in Tokyo.

Details: Takeda is suspected of paying bribes to secure the winning bid, though he claims he did nothing wrong.

"Just as the 1964 Tokyo Olympics were intended to show the world that Japan had arrived as an economic power after its near destruction in World War II...

  • "[T]he 2020 Summer Games were supposed to be an opportunity to demonstrate the country's recovery from decades of economic stagnation and 2011's catastrophic earthquake and nuclear disaster," writes the NY Times' Ben Dooley. Now, the whole thing feels dirty.

The bottom line: Whenever there's a massive global sporting event on the horizon, there's a good chance that something sketchy went down behind the scenes. Welcome to planet Earth.

  • Heck, just last week, leaked documents revealed that Qatar secretly paid FIFA nearly $1 billion in bribe money to land the 2022 World Cup.

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Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Politics: Americans feel Trump's sickness makes him harder to trustFlorida breaks record for in-person early voting — McConnell urges White House not to strike stimulus deal before election — Republican senators defend Fauci as Trump escalates attacks.
  2. Health: The next wave is gaining steam.
  3. Education: Schools haven't become hotspots — University of Michigan students ordered to shelter-in-place.
  4. World: Ireland moving back into lockdown — Argentina becomes 5th country to report 1 million infections.

Report: Goldman to settle DOJ probe into Malaysia's 1MDB for over $2B

Illustration: Lazaro Gamio/Axios

Goldman Sachs has agreed with the Department of Justice to pay over $2 billion for the bank's role in Malaysia's multi-billion dollar scandal at state fund 1MDB, Bloomberg first reported.

Why it matters: The settlement, expected to be announced within days, would allow Goldman Sachs to avoid a criminal conviction in the U.S. over the bribery and money laundering scandal that saw three of its former bankers banned for life from the banking industry by the Federal Reserve Board.

Trump threatens to post "60 Minutes" interview early after reportedly walking out

Trump speaks to reporters aboard Air Force One, Oct. 19. Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

President Trump tweeted on Tuesday that he was considering posting his interview with CBS' "60 Minutes" prior to airtime in order to show "what a FAKE and BIASED interview" it was, following reports that he abruptly ended the interview after 45 minutes of taping.

Why it matters: Trump has escalated his war on the media in the final stretch of his re-election campaign, calling a Reuters reporter a "criminal" this week for not reporting on corruption allegations about Hunter Biden and disparaging CNN as "dumb b*stards" for the network's ongoing coronavirus coverage.