Jun 12, 2017

Ivanka Trump felt "blindsided" by DC viciousness

Markus Schreiber / AP

Ivanka Trump said Monday that she felt "a little blindsided" by all of the voracity and distractions that have been plaguing the Trump administration:

"It is hard, and there's a level of viciousness that I wasn't expecting. I was not expecting the intensity of this experience, but this isn't supposed to be easy. My father and this administration intends to be transformative, and we want to do big, bold things, and we're looking to change the status quo. So I didn't expect it to be easy, I think some of the distractions and some of the voracity was, I was a little blindsided by on a personal level. But for me, I'm trying to keep my head down and not listen to the noise."

Other highlights from her interview with Fox and Friends:

  • On James Comey: Ivanka said her father feels "very vindicated" and "incredibly optimistic" following Comey's hearing Thursday, adding that through all of the media distraction, the White House has been focused on getting things done. She added that infrastructure week, though it didn't make headlines, will have a "much more important impact."
  • Does Jared Kushner like his job? "He loves it," said Ivanka. "I mean talk about impact."
  • On Jared "clashing" with others in the White House: "There's a 24 hour news cycle that gets sped by and is encouraged by lots of salacious emails, and at the end of the day we're very focused on the work... [Jared] is someone who likes to get things done and doesn't get involved in that."

Go deeper

HBCUs are missing from the discussion on venture capital's diversity

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Venture capital is beginning a belated conversation about its dearth of black investors and support of black founders, but hasn't yet turned its attention to the trivial participation of historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) as limited partners in funds.

Why it matters: This increases educational and economic inequality, as the vast majority of VC profits go to limited partners.

Unemployment rate falls to 13.3% in May

Data: Bureau of Labor Statistics; Chart: Axios Visuals

The U.S. unemployment rate fell to 13.3% in May, with 2.5 million jobs gained, the government said on Friday.

Why it matters: The far better-than-expected numbers show a surprising improvement in the job market, which has been devastated by the coronavirus pandemic.

The difficulty of calculating the real unemployment rate

Data: U.S. Department of Labor; Note: Initial traditional state claims from the weeks of May 23 and 30, continuing traditional claims from May 23. Initial PUA claims from May 16, 23, and 30, continuing PUA and other programs from May 16; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

The shocking May jobs report — with a decline in the unemployment rate to 13.3% and more than 2 million jobs added — destroyed expectations of a much worse economic picture.

Why it matters: Traditional economic reports have failed to keep up with the devastation of the coronavirus pandemic and have made it nearly impossible for researchers to determine the state of the U.S. labor market or the economy.