Oct 7, 2019

Farewell, iTunes

Photo: Lionel Bonaventure/AFP/Getty Images

iTunes is off to the big app farm in the sky, with the latest Mac update officially shuttering the program, AP reports.

The big picture: iTunes revolutionized the way users consume music, promoting the sales of songs at often 99¢ a piece and allowing individuals to easily organize playlists on their media devices. But as music subscription services like Spotify and Apple Music crept in, iTunes began to lose its following.

  • RIAA's music revenues report notes that 80% of music revenue is now coming from paid subscribers and streaming.
  • By closing out iTunes, which hosted various types of media, in favor of separate apps for music, videos, books and other services, Apple will be better able to cater to specific media interests and highlight individual programming.

What's next: iTunes will be replaced by a new music app that will feature the platform's subscription service and Apple's free online radio. The app will house songs previously shelved on users' iTunes accounts.

Go deeper: The music business moves into the streaming era

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Biden formally secures Democratic presidential nomination

Joe Biden speaks at Delaware State University's student cente on June 5. Photo: Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

Former Vice President Joe Biden became the formal Democratic presidential nominee on Friday evening, per AP.

The big picture: Biden has been the presumptive frontrunner to take on President Trump since Sen. Bernie Sanders suspended his campaign in early April.

Updated 8 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 9 p.m. ET: 6,724.516 — Total deaths: 394,018 — Total recoveries — 2,996,832Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 9 p.m. ET: 1,894,753 — Total deaths: 109,042 — Total recoveries: 491,706 — Total tested: 19,231,444Map.
  3. Public health: WHCA president says White House violated social-distancing guidelines to make reporters "a prop" — Jailing practices contribute to spread.
  4. Sports: How coronavirus could reshuffle the sports calendar.
  5. Jobs: Better-than-expected jobs report boosts stock market.
  6. Media: The Athletic lays off 8% of staff, implements company-wide pay cut.

Scoop: German foreign minister to travel to Israel with warning on annexation

Heiko Maas. Photo: Michael Kappeler/picture alliance via Getty Images

German Foreign Minister Heiko Maas is expected to travel to Israel next week to warn that there will be consequences if Israeli leaders move forward with plans to annex parts of the West Bank, Israeli officials and European diplomats tell me.

Why it matters: Israeli and European officials agree that if Israel goes ahead with unilateral annexation, the EU will respond with sanctions.