Feb 13, 2020 - World

Soccer hacker Rui Pinto also behind Isabel dos Santos corruption leaks

Kendall Baker, author of Sports

Portuguese hacker Rui Pinto. Photo: Ferenc Isza/AFP via Getty Images

A 31-year-old Portuguese hacker named Rui Pinto from 2015 to 2019 leaked a series of anonymous documents that exposed corruption in European soccer, pulling back the curtain on the murky world of soccer finance and resulting in criminal prosecutions of several top players.

Driving the news: Turns out the enormous trove of data that Pinto obtained held a much bigger secret, revealing how Isabel dos Santos, Africa's richest woman and the daughter of Angola's former president, exploited her country's wealth to amass a $2 billion fortune.

Pinto was only recently revealed as the source of the "Luanda Leaks" — a collection of 715,000 emails, charts, contracts and audits that was obtained by the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ) and reported on last month in media outlets across the globe.

  • Those reports led to an investigation of dos Santos, who is suspected by Angola's government of plundering the state oil company to bankroll her business empire.

The latest: Portuguese authorities have issued a freezing order on dos Santos' bank accounts, aiding Angolan authorities in their global hunt for her assets.

What they're saying: "Pinto is the Snowden of international corruption," said his lawyer, William Bourdon, who previously represented American whistleblower Edward Snowden. "And he is in jail in a democratic country."

What's next: In September, Pinto was taken into custody and currently sits in a Portuguese prison, awaiting trial on 93 charges, including cybercrime and extortion.

Go deeper: Soccer's racism problem rears its ugly head in Bulgaria-England Euro qualifier

Go deeper

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Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins; Chart: Naema Ahmed/Axios

The epicenter of the COVID-19 pandemic has moved from China to Europe to the United States and now to Latin America.

Why it matters: Up until now, the pandemic has struck hardest in relatively affluent countries. But it's now spreading fastest in countries where it will be even harder to track, treat and contain.

Updated 47 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 7 p.m. ET: 5,768,908 — Total deaths: 358,490 — Total recoveries — 2,399, 247Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 7 p.m. ET: 1,717,756 — Total deaths: 101,562 — Total recoveries: 399,991 — Total tested: 15,646,041Map.
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  4. Congress: Pelosi slams McConnell on stimulus delay — Sen. Tim Kaine and wife test positive for coronavirus antibodies.
  5. World: Twitter slapped a fact-check label on a pair of months-old tweets from a Chinese government spokesperson that falsely suggested that the coronavirus originated in the U.S.
  6. Education: Science fairs are going virtual, and some online elements may become permanent.
  7. Axios on HBO: Science fiction writers tell us how they see the coronavirus pandemic.
  8. 🏃‍♀️Sports: Boston Marathon canceled after initial postponement, asks runners to go virtual.
  9. What should I do? When you can be around others after contracting the coronavirus — Traveling, asthma, dishes, disinfectants and being contagiousMasks, lending books and self-isolatingExercise, laundry, what counts as soap — Pets, moving and personal healthAnswers about the virus from Axios expertsWhat to know about social distancingHow to minimize your risk.
  10. Other resources: CDC on how to avoid the virus, what to do if you get it, the right mask to wear.

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Minnesota activates National Guard amid fallout from George Floyd death

A portrait of George Floyd hangs on a street light pole in Minneapolis. Photo: Stephen Maturen/Getty Images

George Floyd, 46, moved to Minnesota to improve his life and become his "best self," but instead, he is dead because of Minneapolis police.

The latest: Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz declared a state of emergency and activated the state's National Guard in response to violent clashes over the past two days between police and protesters in the Twin Cities.