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Kelly McClenthen returns to see the flood damage to her home with her boyfriend Daniel Harrison in the aftermath of Hurricane Irma in Bonita Springs, Fla., Monday, Sept. 11, 2017. Photo: Gerald Herbert / AP

Irma, which made landfall in the Florida Keys as a Category 4 hurricane Sunday, downed power lines and trees and brought dangerous floodwaters to the state before being downgraded to a tropical storm Monday morning.

Irma's path: The storm currently has sustained winds of 65 mph and gusts of more than 90 mph. It's now headed in the direction of Georgia, Alabama, Tennessee, and the Carolinas.

Live updates:

  • At least seven people in Florida, two in Georgia and one in South Carolina have been killed by Irma, per the AP. The death toll in the Caribbean has risen to 37.
  • More than 7 million people in Florida have lost power, per AP. FEMA chief Brock Long added that some areas won't have electricity for weeks.
  • Jacksonville, FL, the largest U.S. city geographically, experienced a record storm surge and was pummeled by severe flash flooding Monday afternoon.
  • Mayor Charlie Latham of Jacksonville Beach told CNN that about 90% of people in the city had lost power. "I've never seen anything like it," he said.
  • A flash flood emergency was issued for Charleston, South Carolina, and a tornado watch for southern South Carolina and coastal Georgia has been extended to 10 p.m. Monday.
  • As of 2:30 pm, more than 923,000 customers lost power in Georgia, according to Georgia Emergency Management and DHS.
  • Tampa Mayor Bob Buckhorn, who said Sunday that the city was soon to get "punched in the face," said Monday that Tampa was spared Irma's worst.

Go deeper in the Axios stream:

Go deeper

Off the Rails

Episode 7: Trump turns on Pence

Photo illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios. Photos: Elijah Nouvelage, Alex Wong/Getty Images

Beginning on election night 2020 and continuing through his final days in office, Donald Trump unraveled and dragged America with him, to the point that his followers sacked the U.S. Capitol with two weeks left in his term. Axios takes you inside the collapse of a president with a special series.

Episode 7: Trump turns on Pence. Trump believes the vice president can solve all his problems by simply refusing to certify the Electoral College results. It's a simple test of loyalty: Trump or the U.S. Constitution.

"The end is coming, Donald."

The male voice in the TV ad boomed through the White House residence during "Fox & Friends" commercial breaks. Over and over and over. "The end is coming, Donald. ... On Jan. 6, Mike Pence will put the nail in your political coffin."

Big Tech's post-riot reckoning

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Photo: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

The Capitol insurrection means the anti-tech talk in Washington is more likely to lead to action, since it's ever clearer that the attack was planned, at least in part, on social media.

Why it matters: The big platforms may have hoped they'd move to D.C.'s back burner, with the Hill focused on the Biden agenda and the pandemic out of control. But now, there'll be no escaping harsh scrutiny.

38 mins ago - Technology

Why domestic terrorists are so hard to police online

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Domestic terrorism has proven to be more difficult for Big Tech companies to police online than foreign terrorism.

The big picture: That's largely because the politics are harder. There's more unity around the need to go after foreign extremists than domestic ones — and less danger of overreaching and provoking a backlash.