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Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Market participants got little more information on how the Fed plans to boost U.S. inflation with the minutes from the central bank's latest policy meeting on Wednesday, and in particular, lacked guidance on its quantitative easing program.

Why it matters: Some have blamed the Fed's lack of specifics on the future path of QE for the market's pullback since early September.

  • Analysts are still worried markets lack a positive catalyst in the interim period ahead of the U.S. election, as the boost from the $2 trillion CARES Act and the Fed's $3 trillion QE infinity program may have worn off, and there are few assets moving in the opposite direction of equities to provide safe havens.

Don't sleep: The minutes also note the importance of increased fiscal spending to the Fed's improved economic projections, which looks less likely after President Trump's series of tweets Tuesday night.

  • “Many participants noted that their economic outlook assumed additional fiscal support and that if future fiscal support was significantly smaller or arrived significantly later than they expected, the pace of the recovery could be slower than anticipated,” the meeting summary said.

Go deeper

Dual assurances from Biden and Powell

Data: U.S. Department of LaborFRED; Chart: Axios Visuals

President-elect Joe Biden and Fed chairman Jerome Powell had two messages in public remarks on Thursday:

  • Biden's: Help is on the way.
  • Powell's: Help is here to stay.

Kaine, Collins' censure resolution seeks to bar Trump from holding office again

Sen. Tim Kaine (center) and Sen. Susan Collins (right). Photo: Andrew Harnik/Pool via Getty Images

Sens. Tim Kaine (D-Va.) and Susan Collins (R-Maine) are forging ahead with a draft proposal to censure former President Trump, and are considering introducing the resolution on the Senate floor next week.

Why it matters: Senators are looking for a way to condemn Trump on the record as it becomes increasingly unlikely Democrats will obtain the 17 Republican votes needed to gain a conviction, Axios Alayna Treene writes. "I think it’s important for the Senate's leadership to understand that there are alternatives," Kaine told CNN on Wednesday.

Stark reminder for America's corporate leaders

Rosalind "Roz" Brewer is about to become only the second Black woman to permanently lead a Fortune 500 company. She starts as Walgreens CEO on March 15.

Why it matters: It's a stark reminder of how far corporate America's top decision-makers have to go during an unprecedented push by politicians, employees and even a stock exchange to diversify their top ranks.