Intel

Intel posted a long blog post yesterday touting the success and evolution of its 40-year-old x86 microprocessor — the one that powered the first IBM personal computer in 1978 and still powers the majority of PCs and laptops. But it wasn't just a stroll down memory lane. Intel ended the post with a reminder that it won't tolerate infringement on its portfolio of patents, including those surrounding x86."There have been reports that some companies may try to emulate Intel's proprietary x86 ISA without Intel's authorization…we fully expect other companies to continue to respect Intel's intellectual property rights."Between the lines: This is a shot across the bow from Intel. The company doesn't widely license its x86 technologies beyond a couple of agreements (AMD and Via Technologies), and it seems to be concerned that planned efforts to emulate its technology will inevitably infringe its intellectual property.Though not mentioned by name in Intel's post — and a spokesperson declined to name specific companies — Microsoft and Qualcomm have announced plans for a version of Windows 10 on Qualcomm's Snapdragon 835 that uses emulation to run older applications designed for x86-based Windows machines.Intel has in the past targeted those who emulate its x86 instruction set, most notably a well-heeled chip startup called Transmeta that aimed to take on Intel and AMD in laptops in the early 2000s.

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Scoop: Instacart raises another $100 million

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios Visuals

Grocery delivery company Instacart has raised $100 million in new funding, on top of the $225 million it announced last month, the company tells Axios. This brings its valuation to $13.8 billion.

Why it matters: This funding comes at what could be an inflection point for Instacart, as customers it acquired during coronavirus lockdowns decide whether they want to continue with the service or resume in-person grocery shopping.

Updated 52 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 10 a.m. ET: 10,902,347 — Total deaths: 521,940 — Total recoveries — 5,777,662Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 10 a.m. ET: 2,739,879 — Total deaths: 128,740 — Total recoveries: 781,970 — Total tested: 33,462,181Map.
  3. Public health: The states where face coverings are mandatory Regeneron stops trial after drug fails to help patientsWhat we know about the coronavirus immune response — Fauci says it has been a "very disturbing week" for the spread of the coronavirus in the U.S.
  4. Business: Top business leaders urge the White House to develop mandatory mask guidelines.
  5. Politics: Herman Cain hospitalized for COVID-19 after attending Trump Tulsa rally — Biden downplays jobs number, rebukes Trump for ignoring health crisis.
  6. Economy: The economy may recover just quickly enough to kill political interest in more stimulus.
  7. States: Texas mandates face masks in public spaces Florida reports more than 10,000 new coronavirus cases, and its most-infected county issues curfew.

Markets swell as the economy shrinks

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

The economy is sputtering, but the markets are thriving — a highly unusual event that shows how the coronavirus has thrown all bets off.

Why it matters: The disconnect adds to the wealth gap. The richest 10% of households — who own 84% of stocks — are getting richer, while millions of out-of-work Americans cross their fingers that pandemic unemployment benefits will be extended.