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Intel facing three lawsuits over chip security flaw

Photo: Yui Mok / PA Images via Getty Images

Intel is facing three separate class-action lawsuits over the massive chip security flaw that was discovered this week, the Guardian reports.

Why it matters: The vulnerabilities, called Meltdown and Spectre, are found in most processors today. Axios' Ina Fried reported earlier this week that class-action lawsuits were a possibility, and the Guardian reports this is "just one cost Intel will face." The three lawsuits cite security vulnerability, Intel's delayed announcement to the public, and the possibility of a computer slowdown that could be a side-effect of fixing the problem (which Intel denies), according to the Guardian.

  • Intel confirmed the class actions, but said "it would be inappropriate to comment" as the "proceedings are ongoing," per the Guardian.
  • One of the lawyers representing a plaintiff that filed a class-action lawsuit, Bill Doyle, told the Guardian: "The security vulnerability revealed by these reports suggests that this may be one of the largest security flaws ever facing the American public...It is imperative that Intel act swiftly to fix the problem and ensure consumers are fully compensated for all losses suffered as a result of their actions."
Mike Allen 5 hours ago
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A White House olive branch: no plan to fire Mueller

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After a weekend at war with the Mueller investigation, the White House is extending an olive branch. Ty Cobb, the White House lawyer handling the probe, plans to issue this statement:

“In response to media speculation and related questions being posed to the Administration, the White House yet again confirms that the President is not considering or discussing the firing of the Special Counsel, Robert Mueller.”

Why it matters: The White House strategy had been to cooperate with Mueller. So this is an effort to turn down the temperature after a weekend of increasingly personal provocations aimed at the special counsel.

Jonathan Swan 6 hours ago
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Trump's trade plan that would blow up the WTO

President Trump announces tariffs on steel and aluminum earlier this month, flanked by Steven Mnuchin, Wilbur Ross, Robert Lighthizer, and Peter Navarro. Photo: Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images

For months, President Donald Trump has been badgering his economic advisors to give him broad, unilateral authority to raise tariffs — a move that would all but break the World Trade Organization.

His favorite word: “reciprocal.” He’s always complaining to staff about the fact that the U.S. has much lower tariffs on some foreign goods than other countries have on the same American-made goods. The key example is cars: The European Union has a 10 percent tariff on all cars, including those manufactured in America, and China hits all foreign-made cars with 25 percent tariffs. But the U.S. only charges 2.5 percent for foreign cars we import.