Illustration:Rebecca Zisser/Axios

Leading U.S. chipmaker Intel beat earnings estimates for the most recent quarter in results reported Thursday, but its stock plunged after hours after it revealed a gloomier outlook for the rest of the year and new delays in delivering its next-generation 7-nanometer chips.

Why it matters: This is the first quarter to reflect the full impact of the coronavirus pandemic on the U.S. and global economy.

Details:

  • The company reported $1.23 per share in earnings, adjusted, vs. $1.11 per share that analysts expected, according to Refinitiv.
  • Its revenue was $19.73 billion, vs. an analyst expectation of $18.55 billion, according to Refinitiv.

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Video gaming growth soars thanks to pandemic

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Video game usage in the U.S. has skyrocketed during the pandemic, leading to record revenues and profits for gaming companies like Nintendo, Epic Games and Electronic Arts.

Why it matters: The pandemic has sped the rise of video gaming as a core consumer pastime, and the trend is unlikely to reverse even after life returns to normal. "What we're seeing is an acceleration of pre-existing trends," NPD Group gaming analyst Mat Piscatella told Axios. "It's like we jumped ahead two years."

Aug 6, 2020 - Technology

T-Mobile says it's now No. 2 wireless carrier, ahead of AT&T

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

T-Mobile Thursday said it has overtaken AT&T to become the number two wireless carrier in the U.S., ending the second quarter with 98.3 million total subscribers. Shares in T-Mobile surged 7% in after-hours trading.

The big picture: T-Mobile's merger with Sprint, which a federal judge allowed to go forward in February, gave the company a boost, and left the U.S. with only three major national wireless carriers. Verizon is in the lead.

Aug 6, 2020 - Health

The health care sector imploded in Q2

Data: U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis via FRED; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

The pandemic has been very good for health insurers — largely because they don't need to pay for procedures that haven't been happening.

By the numbers: The value of health care services performed in America in the second quarter plunged to $1.69 trillion, from $2.26 trillion in the fourth quarter of 2019. The unprecedented drop was enough on its own to account for 9.5 points of the 32.9% annualized fall in second-quarter GDP.