Photo: NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images

President Trump said Thursday he doesn't trust social media companies to "self-correct" their alleged conservative bias, according to multiple sources in the room.

Why it matters: It's another strong signal that Trump would support harsh regulations or antitrust action against social media companies.

Details:

  • One source recalled, paraphrasing from memory, that Ryan Fournier, the chairman of activist group Students for Trump, asked after the White House's live stream ended, "I know some conservatives have some issues with the idea of regulations. Do you think by doing what we’re doing and continuing to put pressure on these social media companies, that they will continue to self-correct?”
  • Trump replied that "I don't trust them to self-correct," according to the same source. A second source agreed with that recollection of Trump's comments, but a third source in the room recalled it as "No, I don’t think they can self-correct."

The big picture: Conservatives have increasingly been open to regulating tech companies, alleging they supress content produced by the right.

Yes, but: The charges that anti-conservative bias is programmed into social media algorithms have never been backed up by evidence or reporting, even if tech companies are staffed by liberal employees in famously blue Silicon Valley.

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Post-debate poll finds Biden strong on every major issue

Joe Biden speaks Friday about "The Biden Plan to Beat COVID-19," at The Queen theater in Wilmington, Del. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

This is one of the bigger signs of trouble for President Trump that we've seen in a poll: Of the final debate's seven topics, Joe Biden won or tied on all seven when viewers in a massive Axios-SurveyMonkey sample were asked who they trusted more to handle the issue.

Why it matters: In a time of unprecedented colliding crises for the nation, the polling considered Biden to be vastly more competent.

Bryan Walsh, author of Future
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The murder hornets are here

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Entomologists in Washington state on Thursday discovered the first Asian giant hornet nest in the U.S.

Why it matters: You may know this insect species by its nom de guerre: "the murder hornet." While the threat they pose to humans has been overstated, the invading hornets could decimate local honeybee populations if they establish themselves.