Apr 11, 2017

Inside Mitt Romney's "binders full of women"

The Boston Globe got its hands on Mitt Romney's infamous "binders full of women," which were the centerpiece of an awkward 2012 presidential debate moment when Romney tried to illustrate how he'd tried to hire more women for state positions when he was governor of Massachusetts.

Reality check: Looking back on the episode just five years later — particularly after the 2016 election and the Access Hollywood tape debacle — it's shocking to revisit how a candidate's positive, if awkward, response regarding workplace inclusivity became a crippling campaign gaffe.

  • The two binders, which weigh in at over 15 pounds and contain almost 200 resumes, were compiled by MassGAP, a coalition of women's groups in Massachusetts.
  • Romney's chief of staff confirmed that the binders were used throughout his tenure as governor and were ultimately successful at placing women in jobs throughout state government, as well as other boards and commissions.
  • "They drummed up what was an inelegant way to get at this pool of talent," one MassGAP worker summed it up to the Globe.

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Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images.

Sen. Bernie Sanders said in a statement Tuesday night he will request a recount of the Iowa Democratic Party's recanvass results.

Where it stands: Both Buttigieg and Sanders requested partial recanvasses in Iowa last week after results were delayed and showed several errors following a software malfunction on caucus night.

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Energy deputy secretary nominee faces heat after contradicting Trump

Mark Menezes speaks at a forum in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, June 12. Photo: Minasse Wondimu Hailu/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

Trump administration officials are internally raising concerns about President Trump’s nominee for Energy deputy secretary, who appeared to openly contradict the president on nuclear waste storage at Nevada’s Yucca Mountain last week.

Driving the news: While speaking at a House Energy and Commerce subcommittee hearing last Wednesday, Mark Menezes told members of the panel that the Trump administration is still interested in storing nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain and that “what we're trying to do is to put together a process that will give us a path to permanent storage at Yucca."