Apr 14, 2017

Inside Elizabeth Warren's new book

Mike Allen, author of AM

Carolyn Kaster / AP

Sen. Elizabeth Warren makes it clear in her new book, "This Fight Is Our Fight: The Battle to Save America's Middle Class" (out Tuesday) that she wants to remain central to the Democrats' conversation as they look toward 2020.

We got our mitts on a signed copy. At times, Warren takes the breezily dismissive approach to Trump that may be the key to rankling him in his reelection race, referring at one point to "the hot-air balloon known as @RealDonaldTrump."

The highlights:

  • "Trump slammed back at me repeatedly [on Twitter], hitting me over and over with his lame nicknames [Goofy, Pocahontas]. But he couldn't seem to come up with much more than that. (Sad!)"
  • [T]hose tweetstorms and Facebook posts causes millions of people to tune in -- at one point, about forty-six million people were following these exchanges."
  • "Trump had figured out early on that every over-the-top tweet became a news story. Now there was a fresh story line: someone had found a way to get under Donald Trump's skin and fight back."
  • "We've ... got to be prepared to lose some battles. Without control of Congress or the White House, we will often come up short."
  • "The day after the inauguration, "I was back home in Cambridge, back in my own bed. As I woke up I thought, 'One day into his presidency and at least Donald Trump hasn't blown up the world yet. Only 1,460 days to go.'"

From the Acknowledgments: "Once again, Bob Barnett served as a thoughtful adviser, always ready with wise counsel or a deliciously funny barb."

Go deeper

Updates: George Floyd protests continue for 8th day

Police officers wearing riot gear push back demonstrators outside of the White House on Monday. Photo: Jose Luis Magana/AFP via Getty Images

Protests over the death of George Floyd and other police-related killings of black people continued Tuesday across the U.S. for the eighth consecutive day, prompting a federal response from the National Guard, Immigration and Customs Enforcement and Customs and Border Protection.

The latest: The National Park Service said in a statement Tuesday that while it "is committed to the peaceful expression of First Amendment rights," it "cannot tolerate violence to citizens or officers or damage to our nation’s resources that we are entrusted to protect."

American carnage

Protesters race up a hill to avoid tear gas in Philadelphia, June 1. Photo: Mark Makela/Getty Images

The list of victims has swiftly grown since George Floyd died in police custody just eight days ago.

The big picture: Protests against police brutality have turned into a showcase of police brutality, with tear gas and rubber bullets deployed against crowds. The police have the arsenals at their disposal, but we're also seeing law enforcement officers becoming targets.

McConnell blocks resolution condemning Trump's actions against peaceful protesters

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) blocked a resolution introduced by Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) on Tuesday that would have condemned the use of tear gas and rubber bullets against peaceful protesters outside the White House on Monday in order to allow President Trump to walk to St. John's Church.

What they're saying: "Justice for black Americans in the face of unjust violence, and peace for our country in the face of looting, riots, and domestic terror. Those are the two issues Americans want addressed," McConnell said on the Senate floor.