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Data:Investing.com ; Chart: Axios Visuals

As the coronavirus pandemic throttles economies around the globe, central banks are keeping rates low and using quantitative easing policies similar to the Fed's even in some emerging countries.

Why it matters: Policymakers are likely to face a grim choice very soon: whether to continue to support economic growth by keeping rates low and risking a marked increase in inflation, or raise rates to tamp down on inflation and risk exacerbating the coronavirus-driven recession.

The state of play: Since 2019, emerging market central banks have provided more than 5,500 basis points of interest rates cuts, per Bloomberg.

  • But in some emerging countries, including India, Mexico and Turkey (three of the largest), inflation already is rising out of central bankers' target ranges.

Go deeper

Dion Rabouin, author of Markets
Nov 9, 2020 - Economy & Business

Emerging market assets are back in the spotlight

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The expected gridlock in Washington and more monetary easing across the globe combined with a less antagonistic approach to countries like Mexico and China from President-elect Biden is getting asset managers excited about emerging markets again.

State of play: Fund managers at JPMorgan Asset Management say EM assets are in a “sweet spot” in the months ahead, especially bonds denominated in local currency.

Wisconsin recount reaffirms Biden's victory in the state

Photo by Mark Makela/Getty Images

The two recounts in Wisconsin requested by the Trump campaign were completed Sunday and confirmed that President-elect Joe Biden won the state, the Washington Post reports.

Driving the news: Biden won Wisconsin by more than 20,000 votes. Recounts in the state's most populous and liberal areas — Dane and Milwaukee counties — netted him an additional 87 votes.

15 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Congressional Hispanics want Lujan Grisham at HHS

Michelle Lujan Grisham arriving on Capitol Hill. Photo: Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call

Hispanic lawmakers are openly lobbying to have New Mexico Governor Michelle Lujan Grisham be named Health and Human Services secretary, according to a letter obtained by Axios.

Why it matters: These members are now following the example some Black lawmakers have used for weeks: trying to convince Joe Biden his political interests will be served by rewarding certain demographic groups with Cabinet picks.