Data:Investing.com ; Chart: Axios Visuals

As the coronavirus pandemic throttles economies around the globe, central banks are keeping rates low and using quantitative easing policies similar to the Fed's even in some emerging countries.

Why it matters: Policymakers are likely to face a grim choice very soon: whether to continue to support economic growth by keeping rates low and risking a marked increase in inflation, or raise rates to tamp down on inflation and risk exacerbating the coronavirus-driven recession.

The state of play: Since 2019, emerging market central banks have provided more than 5,500 basis points of interest rates cuts, per Bloomberg.

  • But in some emerging countries, including India, Mexico and Turkey (three of the largest), inflation already is rising out of central bankers' target ranges.

Go deeper

Fed upgrades expectations for pandemic-hit economy

Jerome Powell testifies before Congress in June. (Photo: Tasos Katopodis/Pool/ AFP via Getty Images)

The Federal Reserve said Wednesday that the economy will shrink by 3.7% this year — a rosier outlook than the 6.5% contraction initially projected in June.

Why it matters: The economy is still wrecked by the coronavirus pandemic, but has rebounded faster than some anticipated. Signs still suggest the recovery could stall out. The August unemployment rate is already lower than where the Fed, in June, said it would be by year-end.

Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 7 a.m. ET: 30,804,120 — Total deaths: 957,348— Total recoveries: 21,062,785Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 7 a.m. ET: 6,766,631 — Total deaths: 199,268 — Total recoveries: 2,577,446 — Total tests: 94,211,463Map.
  3. Education: What we overlooked in the switch to remote learning
  4. Politics: In reversal, CDC again recommends coronavirus testing for asymptomatic people.
  5. Health: The dwindling chances of eliminating COVID-19.
  6. World: Guatemalan president tests positive for COVID-19 — The countries painting their pandemic recoveries green.

What we overlooked in the switch to remote learning

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

America’s rapid and urgent transition to online school has come with a host of unforeseen consequences that are only getting worse as it continues into the fall.

The big picture: The issues range from data privacy to plagiarism, and schools are ill-equipped to deal with them, experts say.