Sign up for our daily briefing

Make your busy days simpler with Axios AM/PM. Catch up on what's new and why it matters in just 5 minutes.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Stay on top of the latest market trends

Subscribe to Axios Markets for the latest market trends and economic insights. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Sports news worthy of your time

Binge on the stats and stories that drive the sports world with Axios Sports. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tech news worthy of your time

Get our smart take on technology from the Valley and D.C. with Axios Login. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Get the inside stories

Get an insider's guide to the new White House with Axios Sneak Peek. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Denver news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Des Moines news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Twin Cities news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Twin Cities

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Tampa Bay news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa Bay

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Charlotte news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Charlotte

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Image: Mail Today / Getty Images

Indian police are searching for a fake doctor whose use of contaminated needles infected at least 21 villagers with HIV in the northern state of Uttar Pradesh, the AP reports.

Why it matters: Despite two decades of strong economic growth, India still struggles to provide basic medical care to its 1.3 billion citizens. It is estimated that 600 million Indians lack access to proper healthcare, leaving millions, especially in poor and rural areas, to seek cheap care from unqualified medics.

Sanctioned quackery

Research shows that despite having more than 400 medical schools, India has only about 12 medically trained doctors, nurses and midwives per 10,000 people. That's about half the World Health Organization's recommendation of 23 per 10,000.

As a result, self-declared "doctors" without formal medical training are sought for up to 75% of primary care visits, according to a study published in Science Magazine. A 2016 WHO report claimed that the situation is even more dire in rural India, where just 18.8% of those claiming to be doctors had medical qualifications.

The response:

  • In a written statement, the Indian government dismissed the WHO report as "erroneous," claiming "all registered doctors have medical qualifications."
  • But the Indian Parliament is considering a bill to allow homeopathic doctors — those practicing alternative forms of medicine, like ayurveda — to practice allopathy (mainstream medicine) after passing a "bridge course."
  • The Indian Medical Association has denounced the proposal and begun to organize protests in both private and public hospitals, according to The Guardian. “The government is giving sanction to quackery," said IMA president KK Agarwal. "If those doctors make mistakes and people pay with their lives, who is going to be held accountable?”

Some good news: 500 million people could receive free health care in India

Go deeper

Kendall Baker, author of Sports
Updated 2 mins ago - Sports

Tiger Woods crash: What we know

Photo: Wally Skalij/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Tiger Woods underwent emergency surgery to repair damage to his right leg and ankle, after he was involved in a single-vehicle accident on Tuesday in which his SUV ran off the road.

What we know: The golf star "is currently awake, responsive and recovering in his hospital room" at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, according to a late-night statement from his team.

Dan Primack, author of Pro Rata
3 mins ago - Podcasts

Corporate America pressures Congress to act on stimulus

Big corporations and top CEOs are putting pressure on Congress and the White House to pass economic stimulus measures, as the political debate drags on.

Axios Re:Cap goes deeper with Heather Higginbottom, a former Obama administration official and president of the JPMorgan Chase Policy Center, about why her organization just published its first-ever set of policy recommendations.

Capitol repairs, security top $30M since Jan. 6 attacks

Photo: Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

The Architect of the Capitol Brett Blanton on Wednesday said that repairs and security expenses related to the Jan. 6 insurrection have already cost more than $30 million.

The state of play: Congressional appropriations committees have allocated the $30 million for repairs and perimeter fencing around the Capitol building through March 31, per NPR.