Expand chart
Data: Census Bureau; Chart: Chris Canipe/Axios

Asians tend to be among the best-educated immigrants to the U.S., and also land in some of the most lucrative careers. But, according to U.S. Census data, the image of privilege is true for only some Asians.

The bottom line: Data shows that income inequality is greater among Asian immigrants than for those arriving from anywhere else.

  • Indians on average earn $64,000 a year, and 78.6% have college degrees.
  • But but but ... Compare that to Afghans ($22,000), Nepalis ($25,000) and Laotians ($32,000).

How to read the chart (above), via Axios visual journalist Chris Canipe: The circles represent each country's population in the United States. Those on the lower left tend to have smaller average annual incomes and are less likely to have college degrees. Those in the upper right have the highest average incomes and are more likely to have degrees.

  • The red circles — representing Asian countries — are spread wider across the chart than circles of other colors, indicating higher inequality.

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