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Mary Altaffer / AP

A judge ruled late last week that IBM owes Indiana $78 million in damages due to its failed attempt to automate the state's welfare services, per the AP. IBM said Monday it would appeal the decision since it "is contradicted by the facts and the law."

The beef: Indiana and IBM sued each other in 2010 when then-Governor Mitch Daniels canceled the $1.3 billion contract between Indiana and IBM to automate welfare applications.

Where the automation fell flat: The idea was for residents to apply for food stamps, Medicaid, and other benefits through call centers, the internet, and fax machines, but when residents started complaining about long wait times, lost documents, and improper rejections, the deal was off. One of the state's private attorneys, Peter Rusthoven, said IBM is "a big corporation that refused all along to take responsibility for its poor performance."

Go deeper

Republicans pledge to set aside differences and work with Biden

President Biden speaks to Sen. Mitch McConnell after being sworn in at the West Front of the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday. Photo: Erin Schaff-Pool/Getty Images

Several Republicans praised President Biden's calls for unity during his inaugural address on Wednesday and pledged to work together for the benefit of the American people.

Why it matters: The Democrats only have a slim majority in the Senate and Biden will likely need to work with the GOP to pass his legislative agenda.

The Biden protection plan

Joe Biden announces his first run for the presidency in June 1987. Photo: Howard L. Sachs/CNP/Getty Images

The Joe Biden who became the 46th president on Wednesday isn't the same blabbermouth who failed in 1988 and 2008.

Why it matters: Biden now heeds guidance about staying on task with speeches and no longer worries a gaffe or two will cost him an election. His staff also limits the places where he speaks freely and off the cuff. This Biden protective bubble will only tighten in the months ahead, aides tell Axios.

Bush labels Clyburn the “savior” for Democrats

House Majority Whip James Clyburn takes a selfie Wednesday with former President George W. Bush. Photo: Patrick Semansky-Pool/Getty Images

Former President George W. Bush credited Rep. James Clyburn with being the "savior" of the Democratic Party, telling the South Carolinian at Wednesday's inauguration his endorsement allowed Joe Biden to win the party's presidential nomination.

Why it matters: The nation's last two-term Republican president also said Clyburn's nod allowed for the transfer of power, because he felt only Biden had the ability to unseat President Trump.