Trump and Pelosi. Photos; AP

President Trump and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi have one thing in common — both are defending men accused of sexual harassment who belong to their own party.

Why it matters: Allegations of sexual misconduct are a bipartisan problem, and more accusations are expected. Senior figures in both parties will help determine whether those allegations are career-ending. They'll also help set the climate in which other accusers come forward — or decide not to.

What Pelosi's saying

On John Conyers: Pelosi called Conyers "an icon in our country." She added, "He has done a great deal to protect women ... I believe he understands what's at stake here, and he will do the right thing." Pelosi also cast doubt on the allegations against the congressman and said he is innocent until proven guilty. She has called for an Ethics Committee review of Conyers.

  • Update: Pelosi released a statement after Conyers stepped aside as ranking member of the Judiciary Committee saying "zero tolerance means consequences." Read the full statement.

On Roy Moore: "We're talking about a child molester."

What Trump's saying

On Moore: "He totally denies [the accusations], you have to listen to him also ... we don't need somebody soft on crime like Jones," Trump said. Trump has given Moore a de facto endorsement by saying "the last thing we need in Alabama" is a Democrat in the U.S. Senate and calling Moore's opponent Doug Jones a "Schumer/Pelosi puppet."

On Al Franken: The president weighed in quickly on the accusations against Franken, tweeting, "The Al Frankenstien picture is really bad, speaks a thousand words." Press Secretary Sarah Sanders said the allegations against Franken are different from those against Trump because Franken admitted to them.

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Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 7:30 p.m. ET: 32,694,155 — Total deaths: 991,273 — Total recoveries: 22,575,658Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 7:30 p.m. ET: 7,074,155 — Total deaths: 204,461 — Total recoveries: 2,750,459 — Total tests: 100,492,536Map.
  3. States: New York daily cases top 1,000 for first time since June — U.S. reports over 55,000 new coronavirus cases.
  4. Health: The long-term pain of the mental health pandemicFewer than 10% of Americans have coronavirus antibodies.
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  6. Education: Summer college enrollment offers a glimpse of COVID-19's effect.
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What they're saying: Trump nominates Amy Coney Barrett for Supreme Court

Judge Amy Coney Barrett in the Rose Garden of the White House on Sept. 26. Photo: Oliver Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

Democratic and Republican lawmakers along with other leading political figures reacted to President Trump's Saturday afternoon nomination of federal appeals court Judge Amy Coney Barrett to succeed Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on the Supreme Court.

What they're saying: "President Trump could not have made a better decision," Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said in a statement. "Judge Amy Coney Barrett is an exceptionally impressive jurist and an exceedingly well-qualified nominee to the Supreme Court of the United States."

Amy Coney Barrett: "Should I be confirmed, I will be mindful of who came before me"

Trump introduces Amy Coney Barrett as nominee to replace Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Photo: Olivier Douleiry/Getty Images

In speaking after President Trump announced her as the Supreme Court nominee to replaced Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Circuit Court Judge Amy Coney Barrett said on Saturday she will be "mindful" of those who came before her on the court if confirmed.

What she's saying: Barrett touched on Ginsburg's legacy, as well as her own judicial philosophy and family values. "I love the United States and I love the United States Constitution," she said. "I'm truly humbled at the prospect of serving on the  Supreme Court."