Trump and Pelosi. Photos; AP

President Trump and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi have one thing in common — both are defending men accused of sexual harassment who belong to their own party.

Why it matters: Allegations of sexual misconduct are a bipartisan problem, and more accusations are expected. Senior figures in both parties will help determine whether those allegations are career-ending. They'll also help set the climate in which other accusers come forward — or decide not to.

What Pelosi's saying

On John Conyers: Pelosi called Conyers "an icon in our country." She added, "He has done a great deal to protect women ... I believe he understands what's at stake here, and he will do the right thing." Pelosi also cast doubt on the allegations against the congressman and said he is innocent until proven guilty. She has called for an Ethics Committee review of Conyers.

  • Update: Pelosi released a statement after Conyers stepped aside as ranking member of the Judiciary Committee saying "zero tolerance means consequences." Read the full statement.

On Roy Moore: "We're talking about a child molester."

What Trump's saying

On Moore: "He totally denies [the accusations], you have to listen to him also ... we don't need somebody soft on crime like Jones," Trump said. Trump has given Moore a de facto endorsement by saying "the last thing we need in Alabama" is a Democrat in the U.S. Senate and calling Moore's opponent Doug Jones a "Schumer/Pelosi puppet."

On Al Franken: The president weighed in quickly on the accusations against Franken, tweeting, "The Al Frankenstien picture is really bad, speaks a thousand words." Press Secretary Sarah Sanders said the allegations against Franken are different from those against Trump because Franken admitted to them.

Go deeper

The coronavirus is ushering in a new era of surveillance at work

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

As companies continue to prepare for the return of their employees to the workplace, they're weighing new types of surveillance in the name of safety.

Why it matters: Just as the coronavirus pandemic has acted as an accelerant for the adoption of remote work, it has also normalized increased surveillance and data collection. In the post-pandemic workplace, our bosses will know a lot more about us than they used to.

Updated 57 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 6 p.m. ET: 11,712,663 — Total deaths: 540,582 — Total recoveries — 6,381,954Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 6 p.m. ET: 2,981,602 — Total deaths: 131,238 — Total recoveries: 924,148 — Total tested: 36,225,015Map.
  3. 2020: Biden releases plan to strengthen coronavirus supply chain.
  4. Public health: Fauci says it's a "false narrative" to take comfort in lower coronavirus death rate — Deborah Birx: Some Southern states "stepped on the gas" when reopening.
  5. World: Brazil's President Bolsonaro tests positive— India reports third-highest case count in the world.
Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Trump administration notifies UN of intent to withdraw from WHO

Photo: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

The Trump administration informed the United Nations and Congress on Tuesday that the U.S. is officially beginning the process of withdrawing from the World Health Organization. The UN is now "in the process of verifying with the WHO whether all the conditions for such withdrawal are met," according to a spokesperson.

Why it matters: President Trump's decision to formally withdraw from the UN's global health agency — which will take effect on July 6, 2021 — comes as the pandemic continues to accelerate both in the U.S. and around the world. The U.S. is by far the largest donor to the WHO out of any country, contributing more than 14% of its total budget.