Sep 20, 2017

How the world reacted to Trump's UN speech

President Donald Trump speaks to the United Nations General Assembly, Tuesday, Sept. 19, 2017, in New York. Photo: Evan Vucci / AP

The WashPost lead headline calls it "defiant." The N.Y. Times and L.A. Times both go with "combative." The Financial Times calls it a "tirade."

President Trump's maiden speech to the United Nations General Assembly reflected the dichotomy we have seen throughout this presidency: hot, even juvenile rhetoric, cloaking substance that's very much within the 40 yard lines of traditional Republican foreign policy.

The world reacts:

  • Max Boot, CFR senior fellow: President Harry Truman, who addressed the U.N. founding conference in 1945, "would have been appalled to see a U.S. president threatening war and praising national sovereignty as the greatest good."
  • "Reshaping U.S. Role With One Word" — N.Y. Times front-page analysis by Mark Landler: "Trump, in declaring ... that sovereignty should be the guiding principle of affairs between nations, sketched out a radically different vision of the world order than his forebears, who founded the United Nations after World War II to deal collectively with problems they believed would transcend borders."
  • How Asia sees Trump ... Lead du jour, from AP's Foster Klug in Seoul, South Koreal: "Was it a bluff? A warning that Washington would shoot down North Korea's next missile test? A restatement of past policy? Or simply just what it seemed: a straightforward threat of annihilation from the president of the United States?"
  • "Officials and pundits across Asia struggled Wednesday to parse Donald Trump's vow Tuesday at the U.N. General Assembly to 'totally destroy North Korea' if provoked."
  • The other end of the telescope: "Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov told The Associated Press in an interview ... that he heard positive news in President Donald Trump's United Nations address: 'that the U.S. would not impose its way of life on others.'"

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Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 9 a.m. ET: 952,171 — Total deaths: 48,320 — Total recoveries: 202,541Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 9 a.m. ET: 216,722 — Total deaths: 5,137 — Total recoveries: 8,672Map.
  3. Stimulus updates: Social Security recipients won't need to file a tax return to receive their checks.
  4. Jobs update: 6.6 million people filed for unemployment last week, a staggering number that eclipses the record set on March 26.
  5. Health updates: The Trump administration won't reopen enrollment for ACA marketplaces this year.
  6. National updates: The Grand Canyon closed after a resident tested positive for coronavirus.
  7. World update: Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu re-entered self-quarantine after his health minister tested positive for coronavirus.
  8. What should I do? Answers about the virus from Axios expertsWhat to know about social distancingQ&A: Minimizing your coronavirus risk.
  9. Other resources: CDC on how to avoid the virus, what to do if you get it.

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