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Illustration: Rebecca Zisser/Axios

What it means to have a community has changed dramatically over the last two decades. In the latest episode of the Masters of Scale podcast, host Reid Hoffman discusses where things stood in 1997, when he was founding an early social media company:

"The idea with SocialNet was that the online community was important, but what most mattered was local community, was the people that you actually spent time with around you, that you could touch, the tactile experience of the people you're going through life together."

Why it matters: Where community was once tied to your geographic location and the people around you, the internet and the rise of social networks broadened that definition to include any group with a shared interest, writes media trends reporter Sara Fischer.

The value of these communities is clear in cases where geographically dispersed people share a problem or cause, like those dealing with rare forms of cancer, immigrants acclimating to a new country, and mothers in need of breast milk to keep their kids healthy.

  • Yes, but: Virtual communities based on shared interests can have dark sides, too, particularly when it comes to politics. Social media users often self-select into groups with similar points of view, creating so-called filter bubbles that can increase polarization and discourage civil discourse.

To Hoffman's point, the web has also created more opportunities for people to connect with those people physically close to them through geo-targeted event postings, recommendations and groups catering to those with a shared interest within the same town or city.

Be smart: Despite all the opportunities to connect with others digitally, people across age groups ultimately crave in-person interactions, according to a recent SurveyMonkey poll for "Axios on HBO".

Expand chart
Data: SurveyMonkey poll conducted Nov. 9 to 13 among 1,820 U.S. adults. Total margin of error is ±3 percentage points. Modeled error estimates: Ages 18–34 ±6, Ages 35–46 ±4, Ages 65+ ±7. Survey methodology. Chart: Harry Stevens/Axios

Go deeper: Listen to the full episode of the Masters of Scale podcast.

Go deeper

Capitol repairs, security top $30M since Jan. 6 attacks

Photo: Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

The Architect of the Capitol Brett Blanton on Wednesday said that repairs and security expenses related to the Jan. 6 insurrection have already cost more than $30 million.

The state of play: Congressional appropriations committees have allocated the $30 million for repairs and perimeter fencing around the Capitol building through March 31, per NPR.

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

White House stands by imperiled Tanden nomination after Senate panel postpones hearing

Neera Tanden. Photo: Anna Moneymaker/The New York Times/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The Senate Homeland Security Committee is postponing a confirmation hearing scheduled Wednesday for Neera Tanden, Axios has learned, a potential death knell for President Biden's nominee to lead the Office of Management and Budget.

The latest: Asked Wednesday afternoon whether Tanden has offered to withdraw her nomination, Psaki told reporters, "That’s not the stage we’re in." She noted that it's a "numbers game" and a "matter of getting one Republican" to support the nomination.

Acting Capitol Police chief: Officers were unsure of lethal force rules on Jan. 6

Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Acting U.S. Capitol Police Chief Yogananda Pittman wrote in prepared remarks for a House hearing on Thursday that officers in her department were "unsure of when to use lethal force" during the Jan. 6 insurrection.

Why it matters: Capitol Police did deploy lethal force on Jan. 6 — shooting and killing 35-year-old Ashli Babbit — but have faced questions over why officers appeared to be less forceful against pro-Trump rioters than participants in previous demonstrations, including those over Black Lives Matter and now-Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh.