Illustration: Lazaro Gamio / Axios

Supporters of the Affordable Care Act are ready to roll out a new campaign encouraging people to buy insurance — an effort they hope will make up for at least some of the cuts the Trump administration has made to enrollment outreach.

Why it matters: The ACA only works if people sign up, and the Trump administration has canceled or rolled back almost every effort to get people enrolled. Outside groups can't fill that void entirely, but they're hoping to at least keep enrollment stable.

The details: The new campaign, which will launch today, is called Get America Covered. Its staff and co-chairs draw heavily from people who worked on ACA enrollment in the Obama administration's Health and Human Services Department.

  • The group's initial focus, co-founder Lori Lodes said, will be on partnerships with employers, community organizations and other existing avenues for outreach.
  • It will run some digital advertising, targeted toward the uninsured, but no TV spots.
  • The group's national co-chairs are a mix of health-policy types, celebrities and political figures: Democratic activist Van Jones; actress Alyssa Milano; actor Bradley Whitford; ousted health insurance CEO Mario Molina; and former Obama health care official Andy Slavitt.

The catch: There's only so much any outside group can do, and Get America Covered is starting with a six-figure budget. That could grow, but it won't be able to amass anywhere near the resources the federal government could bring to bear. And HHS alone has access to the most valuable enrollment tool — the list of people who have previously shopped for coverage.

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Updated 46 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Supreme Court denies Pennsylvania GOP request to limit mail-in voting

Protesters outside Supreme Court. Photo: Daniel Slim/AFP via Getty Images

The Supreme Court on Monday denied a request from Pennsylvania's Republican Party to shorten the deadlines for mail-in ballots in the state. Thanks to the court's 4-4 deadlock, ballots can be counted for several days after Election Day.

Why it matters: It's a major win for Democrats that could decide the fate of thousands of ballots in a crucial swing state that President Trump won in 2016. The court's decision may signal how it would deal with similar election-related litigation in other states.

Microphones will be muted during parts of Thursday's presidential debate

Photos: Jim Watson and Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

The Commission on Presidential Debates adopted new rules on Monday to mute microphones to allow President Trump and Joe Biden two minutes of uninterrupted time per segment during Thursday night's debate, AP reports.

Why it matters: In the September debate, Trump interrupted Biden 71 times, compared with Biden's 22 interruptions of Trump.

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

  1. Politics: Trump says if Biden's elected, "he'll listen to the scientists"Trump calls Fauci a "disaster" on campaign call.
  2. Health: Coronavirus hospitalizations are on the rise — 8 states set single-day coronavirus case records last week.
  3. States: Wisconsin judge reimposes capacity limit on indoor venues.
  4. Media: Trump attacks CNN as "dumb b*stards" for continuing to cover pandemic.
  5. Business: Consumer confidence surveys show Americans are getting nervousHow China's economy bounced back from coronavirus.
  6. Sports: We've entered the era of limited fan attendance.
  7. Education: Why education technology can’t save remote learning.

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