Photo: Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

13 of the 41 Republican lawmakers who were listed by Rep. Matt Gaetz as planning to storm a closed-door hearing Wednesday to protest an alleged lack of transparency in the impeachment inquiry sit on committees with the power to question witnesses and review documents.

The big picture: The inquiry is currently being led by the House Intelligence, Foreign Affairs and Oversight committees, which are comprised of 48 Republicans in total. House Homeland Security Chairman Bennie Thompson (D-Miss.) has asked the House Sergeant at Arms to "take action" against the members involved in Wednesday's protest, after lawmakers reportedly brought cellphones inside the classified room and forced the deposition to be delayed for five hours.

Worth noting: A full House vote authorizing an impeachment inquiry would likely allow Republicans to call their own witnesses, but any subpoenas they attempt to issue could be vetoed by Democrats.

Details: The following Republican lawmakers sit on the relevant committees and were listed by Gaetz as planning to participate in the event. Some simply attended the press conference and did not enter the secure briefing room.

Go deeper: Reports: Ukraine felt early Trump pressure and knew of military aid freeze

Editor‘s note: This story has been updated to clarify that the lawmakers named were listed as being part of the protest in a press release. Not all may have actually participated.

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