Oct 23, 2019

13 Republicans involved in impeachment protest already have access to hearings

Photo: Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

13 of the 41 Republican lawmakers who were listed by Rep. Matt Gaetz as planning to storm a closed-door hearing Wednesday to protest an alleged lack of transparency in the impeachment inquiry sit on committees with the power to question witnesses and review documents.

The big picture: The inquiry is currently being led by the House Intelligence, Foreign Affairs and Oversight committees, which are comprised of 48 Republicans in total. House Homeland Security Chairman Bennie Thompson (D-Miss.) has asked the House Sergeant at Arms to "take action" against the members involved in Wednesday's protest, after lawmakers reportedly brought cellphones inside the classified room and forced the deposition to be delayed for five hours.

Worth noting: A full House vote authorizing an impeachment inquiry would likely allow Republicans to call their own witnesses, but any subpoenas they attempt to issue could be vetoed by Democrats.

Details: The following Republican lawmakers sit on the relevant committees and were listed by Gaetz as planning to participate in the event. Some simply attended the press conference and did not enter the secure briefing room.

Go deeper: Reports: Ukraine felt early Trump pressure and knew of military aid freeze

Editor‘s note: This story has been updated to clarify that the lawmakers named were listed as being part of the protest in a press release. Not all may have actually participated.

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Rep. Carolyn Maloney picked to chair House Oversight Committee

Carolyn Maloney (D-N.Y.), flanked by Democratic Caucus Chair Rep. Hakeem Jeffries (D-N.Y.) and Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Eliot Engel (D-N.Y.) Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Rep. Carolyn Maloney (D-N.Y.) will become the first woman to chair the House Oversight Committee, after defeating Rep. Gerry Connolly (D-Va.) in a caucus-wide vote, Politico reports.

Why it matters: Maloney has been acting as the committee's chair since the Oct. 17 death of Rep. Elijah Cummings (D-Md.) Leading the Oversight Committee will thrust Maloney into the center of the impeachment inquiry into President Trump. The Oversight Committee is one of the congressional panels leading the probe.

Go deeperArrowNov 20, 2019

House Republicans storm closed impeachment hearing in protest

Photo: Alex Wroblewski/Getty Images

About 30 House Republicans attempted to force entry Wednesday into the closed-door hearing where Laura Cooper, deputy assistant secretary of defense, was scheduled to testify in the impeachment inquiry into President Trump and Ukraine.

The big picture: The Republicans are protesting a lack of transparency in the impeachment process, alleging that the inquiry is not legitimate because a full House vote has not been held and attacking Democrats for holding hearings in private. Because of their efforts to disrupt the hearing, Cooper's testimony was delayed for five hours and began at about 3 pm ET.

Go deeperArrowUpdated Oct 23, 2019

What to expect from impeachment

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Starting today, Democrats will do everything they can to put the most damaging testimony against President Trump in front of the public — while Republicans try to put as much distance as possible between Trump and the efforts to pressure Ukraine.

Why it matters: The American public, which has largely been left out of the impeachment process so far, will get a front row seat to the fourth attempt in U.S. history to remove a president from office.

Go deeperArrowNov 13, 2019