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Capitol Police attempting to hold back people during the Jan. 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol. Photo: Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

The House of Representatives voted 213-212 Thursday to approve a $1.9 billion bill that would increase security at the U.S. Capitol in the aftermath of the deadly Jan. 6 riot.

Why it matters: Democrats have argued the upgrades funded by the legislation are needed to patch the security shortcomings exploited by the pro-Trump mob on the day of the riot. Some Republicans have warned the measures are an overreaction.

Between the lines: A handful of progressives voted "no" or "present" on the bill, citing policing concerns.

Context: The Architect of the Capitol Brett Blanton said in February that repairs and security expenses stemming from the riot had cost more than $30 million at that time.

The big picture: The bill gives Capitol Police $43.9 million, $31.1 million of which is meant to go toward backfilling overtime until the department can hire and train more officers, according to a summary statement released by the House Appropriations Committee.

  • The force would also receive $1.3 million for gas masks, tactical vests, body armor, and other equipment; $2.6 million to buy basic riot control equipment for all officers; and $4.4 million for wellness and trauma support.
  • The National Guard, which sent troops to the Capitol on Jan. 6 to respond to the riot, will receive $520.9 million from the legislation to pay for costs associated with stationing troops in and around the building.
  • It gives $250 million for Capitol grounds security, which may be used for physical infrastructure including retractable fencing and security sensors.
  • An additional $162.7 million would be set aside to harden accessible windows and doors at the Capitol as well as at House and Senate office buildings.

The House passed a bill Wednesday establishing a 9/11-style commission to investigate the riot, though only 35 Republicans voted in favor of the legislation. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) has voiced his opposition to the bill.

What's next: The security funding legislation now heads to the Senate, where it will need to win 60 votes before being sent to President Biden's desk to be signed into law.

Go deeper

McConnell formally announces opposition to Jan. 6 commission

Mitch McConnell on May 18. Photo: Samuel Corum/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) publicly announced his opposition Wednesday to a 9/11-style commission to investigate the Jan. 6 Capitol riot, after informing Republican colleagues at a closed-door lunch on Tuesday.

Why it matters: The House is set to vote Wednesday on creating the bipartisan commission, also opposed by House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.), that would investigate the "facts and circumstances" of the Capitol attack led largely by supporters of former President Trump.

May 19, 2021 - Politics & Policy

Sources: McConnell opposed to current Jan. 6 commission

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell heads to a Senate Republican Policy luncheon Tuesday. Photo: Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) told his fellow Republicans during a closed-door caucus lunch Tuesday he can't support a Jan. 6 commission in its current form, two sources familiar with his remarks tell Axios.

Why it matters: Senate Republicans are bracing for a House vote Wednesday. Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) opposes the commission but several Republicans are expected to buck leadership — making it more difficult for Senate Republicans to dismiss it.

35 Republicans vote in favor of Jan. 6 commission

Pro-Trump rioters at the U.S. Capitol building on Jan. 6, 2021. Photo: Eric Lee/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The House of Representatives voted 252-175 on Wednesday to pass a bill to set up a bipartisan 9/11-style commission to investigate the deadly Jan. 6 Capitol riots.

Why it matters: Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy and GOP leadership oppose the commission, but 35 House Republicans voted in support of the bill, underscoring the fault lines within the party in the aftermath of the insurrection.