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TechCrunch hosted its annual Crunchies award show on Monday. Highlights:

  • Tech leaders who are working with Trump "are on the wrong side of history, no matter what you accomplish, this will be your legacy," said Erica Baker, co-founder of Project Include.
  • Jeff Lawson, who co-founded and is the CEO of Twilio, reminded everyone "who the real enemy is"—and it's not fellow Americans.
  • Marissa Mayer, CEO of Yahoo, came out to present an award and somehow agreed to a script that poked fun at her company. Yahoo's sale to Verizon is still to be determined following the disclosures of two massive security breaches, but in any event, Mayer will need a new job.
  • The team of Otto, a self-driving truck company acquired by Uber last year, showed up to pick up its award for "Hot new Startup" while wearing trucker hats—a nod at the profession Otto's technology will soon eliminate.

Why it matters: For better or worse, the Crunchies have become a public attempt by the tech industry to show off its values. The event now makes a conscious effort not to offend (too much), and award winners are increasingly more diverse—an acknowledgement of the industry's overall lack of diversity. And yet, it might no longer be the "it" event it used to be—winners like Snap didn't even bother to show up and host Chelsea Peretti didn't miss an opportunity to point out the empty seats.

Go deeper

Using apps to prevent deadly police encounters

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Mobile phone apps are evolving in ways that can stop rather than simply document deadly police encounters with people of color — including notifying family and lawyers about potential violations in real time.

Why it matters: As states and cities face pressure to reform excessive force policies, apps that monitor police are becoming more interactive, gathering evidence against rogue officers as well as posting social media videos to shame the agencies.

Dan Primack, author of Pro Rata
11 hours ago - Technology

TikTok gets more time (again)

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

The White House is again giving TikTok's Chinese parent company more to satisfy national security concerns, rather than initiating legal action, a source familiar with the situation tells Axios.

The state of play: China's ByteDance had until Friday to resolve issues raised by the Committee on Foreign Investment in the U.S. (CFIUS), which is chaired by Treasury secretary Steve Mnuchin. This was the company's third deadline, with CFIUS having provided two earlier extensions.

Federal judge orders Trump administration to restore DACA

DACA recipients and their supporters rally outside the U.S. Supreme Court on June 18. Photo: Drew Angerer via Getty

A federal judge on Friday ordered the Trump administration to fully restore the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, giving undocumented immigrants who arrived in the U.S. as children a chance to petition for protection from deportation.

Why it matters: DACA was implemented under former President Obama, but President Trump has sought to undo the program since taking office. Friday’s ruling will require Department of Homeland Security officers to begin accepting applications starting Monday and guarantee that work permits are valid for two years.