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Jeff Chiu / AP

Thursday was a big day of headlines for the ride-hailing industry, so here are the highlights:

  1. Uber's self-driving cars aren't improving very fast: According to internal documents obtained by BuzzFeed, Uber's self-driving cars drove at a rate of about a mile without human intervention in Arizona the week of March 5. Recode obtained documents for Uber's testing in Arizona, California, and Pennsylvania, which showed similar slow improvements—and sometimes declining performance.
  2. Uber wants to take Waymo's IP theft lawsuit out of the courts: The company told a judge that it will file a motion to move the lawsuit to arbitration. The reasoning: The former Google employee at the center of it, who now works for Uber, had an arbitration clause in his employment contract.
  3. "Safety third" is the motto at Uber's self-driving unit: This is one of the interesting nuggets from a recent look at Uber's autonomous driving efforts from Bloomberg.
  4. Lyft's $27 million lawsuit settlement is finally approved: The ride-hailing company gets to finally close the book on a 2013 lawsuit over its classification of its drivers as contractors instead of employees. Uber's similar lawsuit, however, is still ongoing.
  5. Spotify is rethinking its relationship with Uber since all the bad press: The music streaming company is allegedly distancing itself from Uber, with which it's had a partnership since 2014 that lets passengers play music while on a ride.

Go deeper

Trump political team disavows "Patriot Party" groups

Marine One carries President Trump away from the White House on Inauguration Day. Photo: Patrick Smith/Getty Images

Donald Trump's still-active presidential campaign committee officially disavowed political groups affiliated with the nascent "Patriot Party" on Monday.

Why it matters: Trump briefly floated the possibility of creating a new political party to compete with the GOP — with him at the helm. But others have formed their own "Patriot Party" entities during the past week, and Trump's team wants to make clear it has nothing to do with them.

DOJ watchdog to probe whether officials sought to alter election results

Donald and Melania Trump exit Air Force One in West Palm Beach, Fla., on Jan. 20. Photo: Alex Edelman/AFP via Getty Images

The Justice Department's inspector general will investigate whether any current or former DOJ officials "engaged in an improper attempt to have DOJ seek to alter the outcome" of the 2020 election, the agency announced Monday.

Driving the news: The investigation comes in the wake of a New York Times report that alleged Jeffrey Clark, the head of DOJ's civil division, had plotted with President Trump to oust acting Attorney General Jeffery Rosen in a scheme to overturn the election results in Georgia.