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Hillary Clinton at the 2016 DNC. Photo: Mark Reinstein/Corbis via Getty Images

Hillary Clinton plans to say in her address to the Democratic National Convention on Wednesday night that to all those who have expressed regret at voting for President Trump or not voting at all in 2016, this November "can’t be another woulda coulda shoulda election," according to excerpts of her remarks.

Why it matters: Clinton will use her return to the (virtual) convention stage after her devastating loss in 2016 to urge dejected Americans not to give up, and to "vote like our lives and livelihoods are on the line, because they are."

What she'll say: "For four years, people have said to me, “I didn’t realize how dangerous he was.” “I wish I could go back and do it over.” Or worst, “I should have voted.” Well, this can’t be another woulda coulda shoulda election.

  • "If you vote by mail, request your ballot now, and send it back as soon as you can. If you vote in person, do it early. Bring a friend and wear a mask. Become a poll worker. Most of all, no matter what, vote. Vote like our lives and livelihoods are on the line, because they are.”
  • “100 years ago yesterday, the 19th Amendment was ratified. It took seven decades of suffragists marching, picketing, and going to jail to push us closer to a more perfect union. 55 years ago, John Lewis marched and bled in Selma because that work was unfinished.”

The bottom line: “There’s a lot of heartbreak in America right now – and the truth is, many things were broken before the pandemic," Clinton will say. "But, as the saying goes, the world breaks everyone, and afterward, many are strong at the broken places. Joe Biden knows how to heal, unify, and lead, because he’s done all of that for his family and his country."

Go deeper

Kamala Harris: "You chose hope, unity, decency, science, and truth"

Photo: Andrew Harnik/AFP via Getty Images

Vice President-elect Kamala Harris said Saturday that the American people chose "hope, unity, decency, science, and yes, truth" in electing Joe Biden the 46th president of the U.S.

Driving the news: Harris, 56, will become the first woman, Black American and Indian American to serve as vice president. "While I may be the first woman in this office I will not be the last," she declared.

2 hours ago - World

Map: A look at world population density in 3D

This fascinating map is made by Alasdair Rae of Sheffield, England, a former professor of urban studies who is the founder of Automatic Knowledge. It shows world population density in 3D.

Details: "No land is shown on the map, only the locations where people actually live. ... The higher the spike, the more people live in an area. Where there are no spikes, there are no people (e.g. you can clearly identify ... the Sahara Desert)."

Biden's Day 1 challenges: The immigration reset

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

President-elect Biden has an aggressive Day 1 immigration agenda that relies heavily on executive actions to undo President Trump's crackdown.

Why it matters: It's not that easy. Trump issued more than 400 executive actions on immigration. Advocates are fired up. The Supreme Court could threaten the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, and experts warn there could be another surge at the border.