Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders in 2016. Photo: Melina Mara/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Hillary Clinton makes her feelings clear about Sen. Bernie Sanders in a new documentary about her career, saying that "nobody likes him" and "nobody wants to work with him," per The Hollywood Reporter.

Driving the news: In an interview with the outlet about Hulu's forthcoming "Hillary," the former secretary of state didn't let up about her 2016 primary opponent, refusing to commit to endorse and campaign for the Vermont senator should he win the Democratic nomination this cycle.

  • She goes even further in the documentary, claiming that Sanders "got nothing done." and calling him "a career politician."
  • "It's all just baloney and I feel so bad that people got sucked into it," she added.

Reality check: Sanders is the most popular senator in the country, according to Morning Consult's quarterly favorability rankings.

What she's saying

On possibly endorsing Sanders: "I'm not going to go there yet. We're still in a very vigorous primary season. I will say, however, that it's not only him, it's the culture around him. It's his leadership team. It's his prominent supporters. It's his online Bernie Bros and their relentless attacks on lots of his competitors, particularly the women."

  • "And I really hope people are paying attention to that because it should be worrisome that he has permitted this culture — not only permitted, [he] seems to really be very much supporting it."

On if a woman can become president: "I think [that sentiment] is untrue, which we should all say loudly. I mean, I did get more votes both in the primary, by about 4 million, and in the general election, by about 3 million."

  • "That's particularly true with what's going on right now with the Bernie campaign having gone after Elizabeth [Warren] with a very personal attack on her. Then this argument about whether or not or when he did or didn't say that a woman couldn't be elected, it's part of a pattern. If it were a one-off, you might say, 'OK, fine.' But he said I was unqualified. I had a lot more experience than he did, and got a lot more done than he had, but that was his attack on me."
  • "I just think people need to pay attention because we want, hopefully, to elect a president who's going to try to bring us together, and not either turn a blind eye, or actually reward the kind of insulting, attacking, demeaning, degrading behavior that we've seen from this current administration."

The latest: Hillary quipped Tuesday afternoon that she thought everyone wanted her "unvarnished views" and that she "will do whatever [she] can to support our nominee."

Go deeper... Elizabeth Warren: Bernie Sanders said a woman couldn't win in 2020

Go deeper

Louisville police declare state of emergency as Breonna Taylor decision looms

A demonstrator holds up a sign of Breonna Taylor during a protest in Louisville, Kentucky. Photo: Brandon Bell/Getty Images

The Louisville police chief declared in a memo obtained by news outlets a "state of emergency" for the department on Monday to prepare for Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron's expected announcement on the Breonna Taylor case.

Of note: Louisville has witnessed more than 115 days of protests over the police killing of Taylor, an unarmed Black woman, with calls for all the officers involved to be charged.

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 9 p.m. ET: 31,1833,800 — Total deaths: 962,793— Total recoveries: 21,348,410Map.
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  3. Health: CDC says it mistakenly published guidance about COVID-19 spreading through air.
  4. Media: Conservative blogger who spread COVID-19 misinformation worked for Fauci's agency.
  5. Politics: House Democrats file legislation to fund government through Dec. 11.
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Sen. Cory Gardner on vacant Supreme Court seat: "I will vote to confirm"

Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

Sen. Cory Gardner (R-Colo.) will vote to confirm President Trump's nominee to replace the late Ruth Bader Ginsburg, he announced in a statement Monday.

Why it matters: The development is a win for President Trump and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.). It should mean Republicans are all but assured to have enough support to hold hearings for Trump's potential nominee.

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