Nov 22, 2017

Higher premiums would cancel out some tax cuts

Some people's tax cuts under the GOP Senate bill would be canceled out by the increased premiums they would face due to the repeal of the Affordable Care Act's individual mandate, according to an analysis by The Commonwealth Fund. And, for those roughly 7 million people who buy insurance on their own but don't get premium subsidies, high health care costs would endure even after the bill's tax cuts expire.

Data: The Commonwealth Fund; Chart: Lazaro Gamio / Axios

Why this matters: This is the downside of repealing the individual mandate in the tax bill. Although doing so provides savings to help pay for the bill's tax cuts, on balance, the bill would leave millions of middle-income Americans worse off financially.

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Warren on economists criticizing her wealth tax: "They're just wrong"

Sen. Elizabeth Warren said at the Democratic debate Thursday that economists who claim her wealth tax proposal would stifle growth and investment are "just wrong."

Why it matters: Warren's riff on the wealth tax, in which she emphasized how "a two cent tax" on fortunes of $50 million and above, has become a core part of her stump speech.

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Keep ReadingArrowDec 20, 2019

The ACA is doing fine without a mandate penalty

Photo: Samuel Corum/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

The Affordable Care Act’s insurance market has not been materially affected by the elimination of the individual mandate penalty — undercutting a key argument in the lawsuit urging the courts to strike down the health care law.

The big picture: Healthy enrollees have not left the market in droves, premiums have not spiked and there has been no market death spiral.

Go deeperArrowJan 14, 2020 - Health

Many Americans still can't afford medical expenses

Reproduced from Gallup; Note: ±4 percentage point margin of error; Chart: Axios Visuals

The latest poll from Gallup shows more Americans are putting off medical care because of the cost.

Why it matters: Despite a declining unemployment rate and growing GDP, an increasing number of Americans say they are forgoing often necessary medical procedures because of the cost.

Go deeperArrowJan 15, 2020