Sep 30, 2017

High school athletes are kneeling during the anthem

Coach Barry Campbell speaks with the Kingwood High School football team at the end of practice. Photo: Matt Rourke / AP

President Trump's attack on NFL players who kneel during the national anthem has made its way to the high school level. This week, a number of high school sports teams saw students protesting, or school officials forbidding they do so.

High schools that protested
  • Jackson High School - Jackson, MI: The football team knelt prior to the national anthem at Friday's game.
  • Traip Academy - Kittery, ME: Nine members of the girls' soccer team knelt during the anthem.
  • New Trier High School and Evanston Township High School - Chicago, IL: Nineteen players total knelt during the anthem, and one player from Evanston sat down.
  • Green Oaks Performing Arts Academy - Shreveport, LA: Student athletes planned to link arms during the national anthem as a form of silent protest.
  • Lakeview Centennial High School - Garland, TX: Eight football team members knelt during the anthem, while other teammates locked arms.
Schools punishing protestors
  • Parkway High School - Bossier Parish, LA: Principal Waylon Bates said failure to stand in a respectful manner "will result in loss of playing time and/or participation...continued failure to comply will result in removal from the team."
  • Manatee County School District - Manatee County, FL: The school district said in a statement to BuzzFeed that students are required to stand "unless excused in writing by a parent."
  • Holy Trinity Diocesan High School, McGann-Mercy High School, St. John the Baptist Diocesan High School - Long Island, NY: Students who kneel during the anthem could face "serious disciplinary actions."
  • Victory & Praise Christian Academy - Houston, TX: Two cousins were kicked off the football team after one knelt during the anthem and the other raised his fist.

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