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Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Latinos who think they have good social standing in the U.S. are more likely to have better cardiovascular health, according to a peer-reviewed paper.

What’s happening: The study looked into how perception of status, success and prestige relative to other people correlates to health factors such as body mass index, blood pressure and levels of cholesterol.

  • It found that how Latinos think and feel about their social standing can have stronger cardiovascular effects than hard data such as income.

Of note: The study included thousands of participants born in other countries, mostly Mexico and Cuba.

  • For those who had extremely low-wage jobs before immigrating, earning dollars in the U.S. can make them feel they have better social standing with resulting health improvements, per the study.
  • While those who had to leave professions that they cannot practice directly in the U.S., for example doctors or lawyers, had a markedly lower self-perception of social standing with corresponding worse levels for risk factors like smoking or blood glucose.

What they’re saying: The study shows how for some “the migration experience coincides with a sense of diminished social status,” which can “influence health and behavior outcomes” in ways data solely on educational attainment, annual income and employment cannot capture, said lead researcher Lissette Piedra.

Go deeper: Racism may be breaking Latinos’ hearts

Get more news that matters about Latinos in the hemisphere, delivered right to your inbox on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Sign up for the Axios Latino newsletter.

Go deeper

Mexico raffles off narco houses

Some of the real estate that was in the lottery, with tickets that each cost 250 pesos, or about $12. Photo: Lotería Nacional de México

The house featuring a hot tub with a secret tunnel that El Chapo used to avoid capture is one of 22 properties seized from kingpins that Mexico raffled off yesterday in a special edition of the lotería.

What’s happening: The property in Sinaloa was one of the prizes, along with mansions that once belonged to Amado Carrillo, alias “El Señor de los Cielos,” and U.S.-born Édgar Valdez Villarreal, aka “La Barbie.

The Exvangelicals

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Even as evangelicals maintain their position as the most popular religion in the U.S., a movement of self-described "exvangelicals" is breaking away, using social media to engage tens of thousands of former faithful.

The big picture: Donald Trump's presidency, as well as movements around LGBTQ rights, #MeToo and Black Lives Matter, drew more Americans into evangelical churches while also pushing some existing members away.

Updated 6 hours ago - Science

Huge wildfire reaches edge of Sequoia National Park

A plume of smoke and flames rise into the air as the fire burns towards Moro Rock during the KNP Complex fire in the Sequoia National Park near Three Rivers, California, on Saturday. Photo: Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images

Firefighters in Sequoia National Park were working into the night after two wildfires merged to reach the Giant Forest Saturday.

Why it matters: This forest contains over 2,000 giant sequoias, including the General Sherman Tree — the world's largest tree by volume. Park officials wrapped the redwoods in foil last week as the Paradise and Colony Fires, now known as the KNP Complex Fire, neared. Protection efforts appeared to be working overnight.