Affordable Care Act

The big picture

The Supreme Court could be Trump's ACA nightmare

The lawsuit could come to a head just before Election Day.

Mar 3, 2020 - Health
The ACA is doing fine without a mandate penalty

The success undercuts a lawsuit against the ACA.

Jan 14, 2020 - Health
The political risk of overturning the ACA

Swing states and red states would stand to lose the most.

Dec 20, 2019 - Health
Trump's all-or-nothing ACA gamble

We've seen this movie before — in 2012, at the Supreme Court.

Mar 27, 2019 - Health
Supreme Court appears likely to save most of the Affordable Care Act

Roberts and Kavanaugh were not inclined to strike down the entire health care law.

Nov 10, 2020 - Health
The 3 questions that will determine the ACA's fate

The court hears oral arguments on Tuesday.

Nov 9, 2020 - Health

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Caitlin Owens, author of Vitals
Nov 6, 2020 - Health

The election killed any dreams of big health care changes

Photo illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios. Photos: Jim Bourg-Pool, Jon Cherry/Getty Images

The likelihood of a Biden presidency and a closely divided Senate means that nothing big is likely to happen in health care for at least the next two years.

The big picture: For all the time Democrats spent debating Medicare for All, competing public insurance options and sweeping federal controls over drug prices, the near-term future for health policy will likely be about gridlock and incrementalism.

Nov 5, 2020 - Health

Health care still loves a divided Congress

Data: Money.net; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

Health care stocks skyrocketed after Tuesday's election results indicated Republicans likely will maintain control of the Senate, all but assuring continued gridlock in both chambers of Congress.

The big picture: A Republican Senate means "the public option and direct government negotiation on drug prices are dead for at least the next two years," Spencer Perlman, an analyst at Veda Partners, wrote to investors Wednesday.

Nov 4, 2020 - Health

Trump's lackluster health care legacy

Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

If this is the end for the Trump administration, it will leave a legacy of failure on health care, and if he's re-elected, he'll have a lot of ground left to make up.

Why it matters: The administration failed to get almost anything it wanted — sometimes the setback was Congress, sometimes the courts, sometimes the administration itself.

Bryan Walsh, author of Future
Oct 24, 2020 - Health

America's poor health is jeopardizing its future

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

From high levels of obesity and opioid addiction to inequities in access to care, America's pre-existing conditions make the country an easy target for COVID-19, as well as future pandemics that could cripple the United States for decades to come.

Why it matters: One of the best ways the country could prepare for future threats — and boost its economy — is to improve Americans' overall health.

Joe Biden's big lead on health care issues

Reproduced from a Kaiser Family Foundation Health Tracking Poll; Chart: Axios Visuals

Health care has fragmented into multiple issues in this campaign cycle, and Joe Biden leads President Trump on almost all of them, according to our KFF polling.

The big picture: Biden’s commanding leads on protecting people with pre-existing conditions and managing the coronavirus outbreak suggest that Trump’s record and rhetoric on those issues, while popular with his base, may have backfired with the electorate generally.

Oct 15, 2020 - Health

How a conservative Supreme Court could save the ACA

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

Even a solidly conservative Supreme Court could find a pretty easy path to preserve most of the Affordable Care Act — if it wants to.

The big picture: It’s too early to make any predictions about what the court will do, and no ACA lawsuit is ever entirely about the law. They have all been colored by the bitter political battles surrounding the ACA.

Oct 14, 2020 - Health

Republicans' Supreme Court message: Don't worry about the ACA

Photo: Jim Lo Scalzo-Pool/Getty Images

Health care was by far the dominant issue in the Senate Judiciary Committee’s confirmation hearing yesterday for Judge Amy Coney Barrett.

The big picture: After promising for 10 years to get rid of the Affordable Care Act, and with a lawsuit pending at the Supreme Court that could do exactly that, Republicans are making a new argument: c’mon, nobody’s getting rid of the Affordable Care Act.

Barrett defends past writings: "I am not hostile to the ACA"

Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett told the Senate Judiciary Committee on Tuesday that she's not "hostile" toward the Affordable Care Act or any statute passed by Congress, defending a past writing in which she criticized Chief Justice John Roberts' opinion upholding the law.

Why it matters: Democrats' central message throughout the confirmation fight has been that Barrett was nominated in order to help President Trump and conservatives dismantle the ACA when the Supreme Court hears a lawsuit against it on Nov. 10.

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