Sunday's health stories

Beware the "science" behind some wellness industry's claims

Gwyneth Paltrow, founder and CEO of Goop onstage at 2019 New York Times Dealbook conference. Photo: Mike Cohen/Getty Images for The New York Times

A surge in misinformation has grown with the internet, making wellness strategies appear to have scientific foundations when instead they're fueling baseless and sometimes harmful theories.

What's happening: Wellness products such as vitamins and supplements are under the purview of the Federal Trade Commission, meaning they are not subject to scrutiny or testing like prescription medication and medical devices, which are managed by the Food and Drug Administration.

Go deeperArrowFeb 15, 2020 - Health

Unilever pledges to stop advertising food and drinks to kids

A boy eats ice cream during the Children's Day celebration in Bangkok, Thailand in January. Photo: Chaiwat Subprasom/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Multinational corporate giant Unilever pledged this week that it will stop advertising food and drinks to children under 12 through traditional media, and kids younger than 13 on social media by the end of the year.

What they're saying: Citing the World Health Organization's alarm bell on childhood obesity, Unilever says that ice cream brand Wall's will not exceed 110 calories or contain more than 12g of sugar per portion.

Go deeperArrowFeb 15, 2020 - Health

In photos: How countries struck by coronavirus celebrated Valentine's Day

A Hong Kong flower shop on Valentine's Day. There are 56 confirmed cases of coronavirus in Hong Kong as of Feb. 14. Photo: Miguel Candela/Echoes Wire/Barcroft Media via Getty Images

Across China and other countries with some of the highest confirmed cases of the coronavirus, people celebrated Valentine's Day as they would any other year: buying flowers and other gifts, attending weddings and spending time with loved ones.

Where it stands: COVID-19 has now killed at least 1,527 people and in mainland China infected nearly 66,497 people, a number the CDC believes is underreported. There are more than 500 cases in 27 other countries and territories.

Go deeperArrowFeb 15, 2020 - Health

French health minister confirms first coronavirus death in Europe

French Health Minister Agnès Buzyn. Photo: Ludovic Marin/Contributor/Getty Images

French Health Minister Agnès Buzyn confirmed on Saturday the death of a Chinese patient diagnosed with coronavirus in a Paris hospital, the first COVID-19 casualty outside of Asia.

The state of play: "I was informed last night of the death of an 80-year-old patient who was hospitalized ... since January 25 and who had a pulmonary infection from the coronavirus," Buzyn said.

Go deeperArrowFeb 15, 2020 - Health