Oct 29, 2017

Harvey's hush money, and the difficult choice to go public

AP / Remy de la Mauviniere

Ronan Farrow, who wrote The New Yorker's Weinstein exposé, returns with ... "Weighing the Costs of Speaking Out ... Annabella Sciorra, Daryl Hannah, and other women explain their struggles with going public."

"[M]any still say that they face overwhelming pressures to stay silent, ranging from the spectre of career damage to fears about the life-altering consequences of being marked as sexual-assault victims.""[T]he actress Ellen Barkin told me that, though she was never a victim of Weinstein's sexual advances, he frequently verbally abused her.""[M]any of the women with allegations about Weinstein told me that the forces that kept them quiet continue to this day. Beginning in the early months of this year, Weinstein and his associates began calling women to determine who had spoken to the press. Three women who received those calls said that they were pressed for details about their communications with reporters. The calls nearly silenced them.""[S]everal other individuals connected to the story received calls from a man they believed was working for Weinstein and posing as a journalist, who offered few details about himself and did not name any publication he was working for. 'He said he was doing a piece about how movies have changed in the last thirty years.'"L.A. Times lead story from Sacramento, "At Capitol, women raise their voices: Once told only in whispers, stories of sexual harassment and abuse are now pouring into public view":What's happening: "No matter the details, each story involves a man with power — the kind of power bestowed by voters, an influential lobbying client or a supply of campaign cash. And instead of wielding that power to shape politics or public policy, the man used it to proposition women or to touch them inappropriately. ... Now the stories are flooding into public view."Why it matters: "Men in politics who engage in this type of behavior might say 'this is absolutely consensual, without realizing there is a power hierarchy that is absolutely unequal, and they should not participate in that,' Assemblywoman Laura Friedman (D-Glendale) said."In their own words.P.S. N.Y. Times' Susan Domnius, on A1: "In late September, just as multiple women were days away from going on the record" about Weinstein, one of his alleged assault victims, Rose McGowan, was offered $1 million in hush money by someone close to Weinstein, in exchange for signing a nondisclosure agreement.

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Coronavirus dashboard

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  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 3 p.m. ET: 1,309,439 — Total deaths: 73,703 — Total recoveries: 273,546Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 3 p.m. ET: 352,546 — Total deaths: 10,389 — Total recoveries: 18,953Map.
  3. 2020 update: Wisconsin governor issues executive order to delay in-person primary voting until June.
  4. Public health latest: Asymptomatic children could play important role in coronavirus spread, new data from the CDC shows.
  5. States' latest: West coast states send ventilators to New York and other states experiencing a more immediate need — Data suggests coronavirus curve may be flattening in New York, Gov. Andrew Cuomo said.
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Wisconsin governor issues order to delay in-person primary voting until June

Photo: Nuccio DiNuzzo/Getty Images

Wisconsin Gov. Tony Evers (D) issued an executive order Monday delaying in-person voting for the state's primary election — currently scheduled for Tuesday — until June 9.

Why it matters: Wisconsin was slated to be the only state to vote on Tuesday amid the coronavirus pandemic, despite having a stay-at-home order in place.

U.S. coronavirus updates: Death toll reaches 10,000

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins; Map: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

Recorded deaths from the novel coronavirus surpassed 10,000 in the U.S. on Monday, per Johns Hopkins data. More than 1,000 people in the U.S. have died of coronavirus-related conditions each day since April 1.

Why it matters: U.S. Surgeon General Jerome Adams said on Sunday the coming week will be "the hardest and saddest week of most Americans' lives" — calling it our "our Pearl Harbor, our 9/11 moment."

Go deeperArrowUpdated 1 hour ago - Health