Harvey Weinstein. Photo: Scott Heins/Getty Images

A juror in the Harvey Weinstein trial told "CBS This Morning" that the cultural impact of the #MeToo movement was not a factor in the decision to convict the film mogul on Monday.

What he's saying: In an interview about the case, the juror, who told CBS to identify him as "Drew," said the deliberations took an emotional toll. But the movement had "absolutely zero" impact on the process.

  • "That's not the job, and it’s not what we were asked to do."
  • "It would be an adulteration of the process to take outside factors and have that weigh on our decision-making process and eventual findings."
  • "And, you know, I have no appetite or aspirations to be the voice or face of both the jury and the larger movement. It's, you know, this case, these people, this is our decision."

Why it matters: The #MeToo movement, which was developed by civil rights activist Tarana Burke, gained traction after allegations against Weinstein came to light in 2017.

  • He was charged with criminal sexual act in the first degree and rape in the third degree. He was acquitted on three other charges.

Go deeper: Global #MeToo movement has resulted in 7 convictions, 4 charges of influential figures

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