Harvey Weinstein: List of sexual assault, harassment charges
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New Harvey Weinstein allegations from Annabella Sciorra and Daryl Hannah

The number of women coming forward with assault allegations against Weinstein is growing. Photo: Richard Shotwell / Invision via AP

Actresses Annabella Sciorra and Daryl Hannah are the latest to come forward against Harvey Weinstein, with Sciorra saying he violently raped her in the early 1990s and Hannah detailing harassment from the early 2000s in a New Yorker article published Friday night by Ronan Farrow.

Why it matters, as noted by Farrow: "All told, more than fifty women have now levelled accusations against Weinstein, in accounts published by the New York Times, The New Yorker, and other outlets."

Weinstein's response, from spokesperson Sallie Hofmeister: "Mr. Weinstein unequivocally denies any allegations of non-consensual sex."

The timeline

  • Oct. 5: The New York Times publishes an investigation detailing numerous on-the-record claims of harassment against Weinstein and at least 8 settlements between Weinstein and his accusers.
  • Oct. 6: The Weinstein Company places Weinstein on indefinite leave. Several Democratic senators announce that they are giving the financial contributions they received from Weinstein to charity.
  • Oct. 7: Lisa Bloom, a civil rights attorney known for defending women in high profile harassment cases, resigns as Weinstein's advisor. She initially received criticism for choosing to defend him.
  • Oct. 8: The Weinstein Company fires Weinstein "in light of new information about misconduct ... that has emerged in the past few days."
  • Oct. 9: The Hollywood Reporter publishes the full text of an email Weinstein wrote to several media executives before he was fired, in which he pleads with them to write letters of support.
  • Oct. 10: The New Yorker publishes a 10-month-long investigation in which 3 women accuse Weinstein of rape. Hillary Clinton and former President Obama come out with statements against the producer. The University of Southern California announces it is rejecting a $5 million donation from Weinstein to its film school. The Wall Street Journal reports that the Weinstein Company is in the process of changing its name as a rebranding move.
  • Oct. 14: In an emergency session, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, the Oscars' governing body, votes overwhelmingly to expel Weinstein.
  • Oct. 15: Woody Allen, who has been accused of molesting his daughter Dylan Farrow and whose son Ronan Farrow wrote the New Yorker piece about Weinstein, says he feels "sad" for Weinstein. Allen draws criticism for saying. "You also don't want it to lead to a witch hunt atmosphere, a Salem atmosphere, where every guy in an office who winks at a woman is suddenly having to call a lawyer to defend himself." He later clarifies his comments and says he meant to call Weinstein a "sad, sick man."
  • Oct. 15: French President Emmanuel Macron withdraws the Legion of Honor, the nation's highest civilian and military award, from Weinstein.
  • Oct. 16: The Clinton Foundation says it will not return the donations — up to $250,000 — from Weinstein because the money has already been spent on projects, Fox News reports.
  • Oct. 16: The Weinstein Company, sinking from the scandal, says it will receive a rescue investment from Colony Capital, a private investment firm led by Trump confidant Tom Barrack.
  • Oct. 19: The Los Angeles Police Department tweeted that it has interviewed a potential sexual assault victim in a 2013 incident involving Weinstein.
  • Oct. 23: New York's attorney general opens a civil rights investigation into the Weinstein Company, asking for records of harassment complaints.
  • Oct. 27: The New Yorker publishes another Ronan Farrow article, this detailing the claims from Sciorra and Hannah.

The allegations

The claims of rape, laid out in more detail in the New Yorker article:

  • Lucia Stoller, now Lucia Evans, was trying to make it as an actress in 2004, the summer before her senior year of college, when Weinstein approached her in a New York club. He began calling her late at night, but she wanted to meet in the daytime. She eventually met with him at his office where they discussed roles. Then, Evans said, Weinstein forced her to perform oral sex on him.
  • Asia Argento, a film actress and director, said Weinstein forcibly performed oral sex on her in 1997. Argento said she didn't speak out until now for fear Weinstein would "crush" her.
  • The New Yorker reports a third woman accused Weinstein of raping her, although her story was not detailed and she was not named.

The on-the-record claims of sexual assault and sexual harassment in the New Yorker:

  • In an NYPD audio recording of a 2015 sting operation, Weinstein admits to groping Ambra Battilana Gutierrez, a model. The day prior, Gutierrez told the NYPD Weinstein had lunged at her, touched her breasts, and tried putting a hand up her skirt. "A source close to the matter" said Gutierrez signed a nondisclosure agreement with Weinstein, including an affidavit stating the acts Weinstein admits to in the recording never happened.
  • Mira Sorvino, an actress who starred in several of Weinstein's films, said Weinstein massaged her shoulders and tried to get more physical in 1995. He later called and told her he was coming over to her apartment, although he eventually left.
  • Emily Nestor, who served as a temporary front-desk assistant at the Weinstein Company, said on her first day two employees told her she was Weinstein's "type" physically and said Weinstein sexually harassed her. She served out her temporary role and left.
  • Weinstein brought Emma DeCaunes, a French actress, to his hotel room, went into the bathroom, and returned naked with an erection and told her to lie down on the bed, DeCaunes said. She refused and left.
  • Rosanna Arquette, an actress, was to pick up a script from Weinstein's hotel room, but said when she arrived he was wearing a bathrobe and pulled her hand towards his visible and erect penis. He allegedly said he needed a massage. She said she wouldn't do that and left.
  • Jessica Barth, an actress, said Weinstein invited her to a meeting at a hotel and invited her to his room, where she said he alternated between talking about roles and demanding a naked massage. She refused and left.
  • Annabella Sciorra, an Emmy-nominated actress, says Weinstein violently raped her in the early 1990s, followed by years of sexual harassment.
  • Daryl Hannah, the actress, says Weinstein harassed her in the early 2000s, asking to touch her breast and attempting to gain access to her room.
The on-the-record claims of unwanted sexual advances in the NYT:
  • Gwyneth Paltrow told the NYT Weinstein placed his hands on her and asked her to come up to his hotel room for a massage after meeting with her when she was 22 before she began shooting "Emma." "I was expected to keep the secret," she said. Paltrow later told Brad Pitt, her boyfriend at the time, about the experience, and Pitt told Weinstein to never touch Paltrow again.
  • Angelina Jolie said Weinstein made unwanted advances on her in a hotel room before the release of "Playing by Heart" in the late 1990s. Jolie said as a result she "chose never to work with him again and warn others when they did."
  • Judith Godrèche, a French actress, recounted similar unwanted advances to the NYT.
  • Katherine Kendall, who appeared in the film "Swingers," said Weinstein once undressed and chased her around a living room.
  • Weinstein invited Tomi-Ann Roberts, hopeful to start an acting career in 1984, to his hotel to discuss a film. When she arrived he was naked in the bathtub and suggested she get naked in front of him. She wouldn't do it and left.
  • Dawn Dunning, who was doing some small acting gigs in 2003, met Weinstein at a nightclub where she was waitressing, and they set up a meeting together. Under the guise of a meeting running late, she was invited up to his suite. When she arrived Weinsten was allegedly in a bathrobe and said she could only work on his films if she had three-way sex with him. According to Dunning's account, he said, "This is how the business works."
Additional claims of sexual harassment and rape:
  • Cara Delevingne detailed an encounter with Weinstein, during which he allegedly asked her to kiss another woman in front of him and tried to kiss her himself, in an Instagram post Wednesday.
  • Zoe Brock, an actress and model, wrote a Medium post accusing Weinstein of asking for a naked massage in a hotel room and chasing her when she refused to comply.
  • Samantha Panagrosso, a model, told Variety that, when she met him at the Cannes Film Festival in 2003, Weinstein groped her in a pool and then followed her into her room, where he allegedly pushed her onto a bed and tried to grope her.
  • Lysette Anthony, a British actress, filed a police report in London alleging that Weinstein raped her in her home in 1992, per CNN. She is the latest woman to come forward with accusations.
  • Lupita Nyong'o wrote an NYT op-ed about an encounter she had with Harvey Weinstein as a student at the Yale Drama School during which he allegedly coerced her into giving him a massage.

Inside the company

16 current and former executives and assistants at Weinstein's company said they witnessed or knew about unwanted sexual advances in the workplace or at events associated with the company's films. Each of the 16 said his behavior was known widely throughout Miramax and the Weinstein Company.

Suspicions of retaliation: Four actresses, including Mira Sorvino and Rosanna Arquette, said they think that after rejecting Weinstein's advances or complained to the company, Weinstein removed them from projects or dissuaded people from working with them, per The New Yorker. They pointed out Gutierrez's experience, where after she went to the police, negative stories about her sexual history appeared in New York gossip pages. As noted above, Weinstein denies those claims.

Go deeper

NYT's Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey: "Harvey Weinstein Paid Off Sexual Harassment Accusers for Decades"

New Yorker's Ronan Farrow: "From Aggressive Overtures to Sexual Assault: Harvey Weinstein's Accusers Tell Their Stories"

Featured

New Yorker cuts ties with Ryan Lizza over alleged sexual misconduct

Lizza. Screengrab via PBS on YouTube.

The New Yorker has cut ties with Ryan Lizza — a prominent political reporter at the magazine who is also a CNN analyst — over "improper sexual conduct," per Politico's Michael Calderone.

The statement: "The New Yorker recently learned that Ryan Lizza engaged in what we believe was improper sexual conduct. We have reviewed the matter and, as a result, have severed ties with Lizza. Due to a request for privacy, we are not commenting further."

Lizza responded, saying the New Yorker's decision was "a terrible mistake."

The law firm representing Lizza's accuser, Wigdor, LLP, put out the following statement, per the Daily Beast: "In no way did Mr. Lizza's misconduct constitute a 'respectful relationship' as he has now tried to characterize it. Our client reported Mr. Lizza's actions to ensure that he would be held accountable and in the hope that by coming forward she would help other potential victims."

Lizza's controversial interview with then-White House Communications Director Anthony Scaramucci led to Scaramucci's resignation.

Georgetown University, where Lizza is adjunct lecturer, said: "Georgetown recently learned of the New Yorker's actions. Classes have concluded for the fall semester at the University. Mr. Lizza will not be teaching any classes next semester."

CNN says Lizza will not appear on air will it looks into the allegations.

Featured

Alabama polls show wildly different results on election eve

Brynn Anderson/AP

One day before Alabama's closely watched Senate special election between Republican Roy Moore and Democrat Doug Jones, two new polls were published — one from Fox News showing Jones leading by 10 points and another from Emerson showing Moore up by 9 .

Background: Since the Washington Post first reported about alleged sexual misconduct by Moore, polls in Alabama have been going back and fourth between both candidates. So who's really leading? The old addage applies: it all comes down to turnout.

What to keep in mind: As the Washington Post's Philip Bump points out, pollsters use various indicators such as historic results and enthusiasm shown by voters in prior polls, to figure out who will turn out on Election Day. There are also other factors that make it tough to determine who's going to turn out, he added:

  1. This is a highly contested statewide contest with few precedents on which to base estimates.
  2. It's happening under the most polarizing president in modern history.
  3. Moore was already an unusual and controversial candidate prior to the allegations.

Worth noting: There's also speculation that there's a pool of voters who won't admit to pollsters they're voting for a man who's facing allegations of sexual misconduct.

Featured

NYC terror suspect in custody after subway blast

The scene following an explosion near Times Square on Monday. Photo: Andres Kudacki / AP

27-year-old Akayed Ullah is in custody after he intentionally detonated a low-tech pipe bomb in a subway station near Times Square on Monday. New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio said the explosion was "an attempted terrorist attack."

The Department of Homeland Security said Ullah came to the U.S. in 2011 after presenting a passport displaying an F43 family immigrant visa. Ullah "is a Lawful Permanent Resident from Bangladesh who benefited from extended family chain migration," said DHS spokesman Tyler Houlton.

Details of attack:

  • The New York Police Department said the explosion occurred in an underground walkway that runs through the Port Authority bus terminal and Times Square along 42nd Street.
  • NYC Police Commissioner James P. O'Neill said during a press conference that Ullah had attached the "low-tech" pipe bomb to himself with a “combination of Velcro and zip ties." It's unclear whether Ullah was attempting a suicide bombing.
  • O'Neill also said Ullah acted alone and no other devices had been found.
  • Following the blast, Ullah was taken into custody and transported to Bellevue Hospital where he was treated for severe burns to his hands and abdomen. NYPD said three others suffered minor injuries.
  • No formal announcement has been made on what's next, but both federal and local law enforcement officials have indicated that Ullah will be prosecuted in federal court in Manhattan, reports the New York Times. The attack is also being investigated by the Joint Terrorism Task Force.

What they're saying:

  • New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo: "This is New York. The reality is that we are a target for people who would like to make a statement against democracy, against freedom. We are not going to allow them to disrupt us."
  • Secretary of Homeland Security Kirstjen Nielsen: The Trump administration is taking “appropriate action to protect our people and our country ... The administration continues to adopt significant security measures to keep terrorists from entering our country and from recruiting within our borders."
  • White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders: : "We know that the president's policy calls for end to chain migration .. had [Trump's] policy been in place, then the attacker would not have been allowed to come into the country."
Featured

White House says Trump accusers' "false claims" are politically motivated

Rachel Crooks, left, Jessica Leeds, center, and Samantha Holvey have all accused President Trump of sexual misconduct. Photo: Mark Lennihan / AP

Three women who have accused President Trump of sexual misconduct spoke out again today in an NBC interview with Megyn Kelly and in a press conference hosted by Brave New Films, saying they hoped their allegations would be treated differently given the momentum of the #MeToo movement. The White House, which has disputed the claims before, issued this statement Monday in response:

"These false claims, totally disputed in most cases by eyewitness accounts, were addressed at length during last year’s campaign, and the American people voiced their judgment by delivering a decisive victory. The timing and absurdity of these false claims speaks volumes, and the publicity tour that has begun only further confirms the political motives behind them."
Featured

Sen. Gillibrand says Trump should "immediately resign"

Gillibrand. Photo: Jacquelyn Martin / AP

Democratic Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand called Monday in a CNN interview for President Trump to "immediately resign" over the allegations of sexual harassment and abuse, and called for a congressional investigation if he declines to do so.

The backdrop: Three senators — Bernie Sanders, Jeff Merkley and Cory Booker — have called for Trump's resignation since Sen. Al Franken announced last week that he would be stepping down over groping allegations. Three of Trump's 16 accusers spoke out Monday, calling for an investigation.

Full quote:

"These allegations are credible, they are numerous, I've heard these women's testimony and many of them are heartbreaking. President Trump should resign his position, whether he will ever hold himself accountable is something you really can't hold your breath for and so Congress should have hearings, they should do their investigation, they should have appropriate investigations of his behavior and hold him accountable."

Featured

White House repeats that allegations against Trump "answered" in election

Sanders listens to reporter's question during a White House briefing. Photo: Alex Brandon / AP

Press Secretary Sarah Sanders said Monday the president has denied all allegations of sexual misconduct in response to Megyn Kelly's Monday interview with three accusers. "This all took place before the election, she said. "We feel like these allegations have been answered."

Trump thinks "it's a good thing for women to feel comfortable in coming forward in general, but he also feels strongly that a mere allegation shouldn't determine the course" of an election, she added.

  • On the Pentagon's decision to allow transgender individuals to enlist in the military: "They are simply complying with a court order."
  • On the attempted terror attack in New York: "We must move to a merit-based system of immigration."
  • Some journalists "purposefully mislead the American people," Sanders said, commenting on Trump's criticisms of "fake news" and Washington Post journalist Dave Weigel on Twitter.
Featured

In early trial, new drug silences Huntington’s disease gene

An experimental drug could slow the spread of Huntington's disease, giving hopes to patients suffering from uncontrolled movements and mental confusion associated with the disease, reports The Guardian. An early-stage trial of the drug was conducted with 46 patients in the UK, Germany and Canada.

Why it matters: Huntington's disease is an inherited condition resulting from a genetic mutation. Current treatments can only help minimize the symptoms, instead of slowing it down.

Professor Sarah Tabriz at UK's University College of London said in a statement on Monday that the drug has lowered the level of the “toxic disease-causing protein in the nervous system, and the drug was safe and well-tolerated. The key now is to move quickly to a larger trial to test whether the drug slows disease progression.”

Featured

Judge warns Manafort to stop discussing his case with media

Paul Manafor leaves the federal courthouse in November. Photo: Jacquelyn Martin / AP

District Judge Amy Berman Jackson chided Paul Manafort on Monday for ghost-writing an op-ed for a Ukranian newspaper, told him not discuss his case with the media, and warned that any similar behavior moving forward will be considered a violation of his gag order, per Reuters.

What didn't happen: Despite Mueller's team arguing that the op-ed is grounds to deny Manafort's request to post $11.65 million in exchange for taking him off house arrest, Jackson said she will determine whether to ease those restrictions at a later date.

Behind Jackson's warning: Jackson argued that even though the op-ed was not published in the U.S., it still could have tainted a local jury given the accessibility of global media.

“All that has to happen is for that favorable article, which is going to ... look on its face to be entirely independent, but is actually in part a message crafted and shaped by you ... is to have somebody you know post it on Facebook, Twitter or a blog, and you have accomplished your goal, given the power of retweeting,” she said.

Go deeper: Mueller weaponizes Microsoft Word; How the Russia probe closed in on Manafort.

Featured

Chef Mario Batali takes leave after sexual harassment allegations

Chef and restaurateur Mario Batali has been accused of sexual harassment by four women. Photo: Andy Kropa / Invision via AP

Celebrity chef Mario Batali is stepping away from his show "The Chew" and his restaurant empire after four women anonymously accused him of sexual misconduct. The allegations, which span at least two decades, were detailed in a report published by food website Eater on Monday.

Batali did not deny the allegations, and apologized for his behavior in a statement to Eater: "... [M]uch of the behavior described does, in fact, match up with ways I have acted. That behavior was wrong and there are no excuses. I take full responsibility and am deeply sorry for any pain, humiliation or discomfort I have caused to my peers, employees, customers, friends and family.”

The allegations: Four women, three of whom had reportedly worked for Batali in some capacity, said the chef touched them inappropriately:

  • One woman who never worked for Batali said the chef rubbed her breasts "with his bare hands" after someone spilled wine down her chest.
  • Another accuser told Eater that Batali touched her inappropriately on several occassions while working for him in the 1990s. She detailed one instance when she says he approached her from behind at the restaurant and "put his hand on half of my butt and he squeezed it.”
  • Another former employee said Batali repeatedly grabbed her from behind and pressed her body against his.
  • A fourth accuser alleged that Batali grabbed her breasts at an industry party.

Backlash:

  • The Food Network said in a statement Monday that it is putting plans to relaunch Batali's “Molto Mario” show on hold.
  • An ABC spokesperson also said the network has asked Batali to step away from “The Chew” while reviewing allegations.
  • B&B Hospitality Group, which represents 24 Batali-owned restaurants, said it took the allegations “very seriously” and agreed with Batali that "he will step away from the company's operations."
Featured

Treasury admits tax plan won't pay for itself

U.S. Treasury Sec. Steve Mnuchin. Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images

The U.S. Treasury Department today released a one-page analysis of the GOP's proposed tax reform plan.

Bottom line: The report acknowledges that the tax plan will not pay for itself via increased economic growth, despite Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin having regularly made such a claim. Instead, getting into the black would require both the tax plan and "a combination of regulatory reform, infrastructure development, and welfare reform."

Moreover, the analysis uses the White House's previous economic growth estimates (made before the tax plan was written) and works its way backwards into the math, rather than analyzing how the actual tax plan would affect economic growth.

The back story: Mnuchin spent months talking about a detailed Treasury analysis of the GOP tax plans, but the NY Times reported in late November that no such analysis actually existed.

Today's release is an apparent remedy, although a single page feels pretty skimpy for an analysis that is supposed to help justify the most significant tax code changes since 1986.