SaveSave story

Haley: U.S. prepared to take military action against Syrian regime

U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley speakING at a Security Council meeting. Photo: Spencer Platt / Getty Images

U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley warned the U.N. Security Council on Monday that the U.S. is willing to act if the body fails to carry out military action against the Syrian regime that's bombing civilians and continues to flout a U.N. resolution.

“We warn any nation determined to impose its will through chemical attacks and inhuman suffering, but most especially the outlaw Syrian regime, the United States remains prepared to act if we must. It is not a path we prefer. But it is a path we have demonstrated we will take, and we are prepared to take again.”
— Haley told the Security Council

The backdrop: This comes on the heels of Syria disregarding a U.N. resolution passed late last month which imposed a 30-day cease-fire to allow humanitarian aid in parts of Eastern Ghouta. Thousands of Syrians have been fleeing from the rebel-held Damascus suburb as the Assad regime — with support from allied militias including Russia — seeks control. More than 600 civilians have been killed since the operation started late last month, according to reports.

Zachary Basu 8 hours ago
SaveSave story

What to watch for in Egypt's sham election

Sisi billboard
A billboard in Cairo voicing support for Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi in the upcoming election. Photo by KHALED DESOUKI/AFP/Getty Images.

Egyptians will vote March 26-28 in a presidential election that is sure to see incumbent strongman Abdel Fattah el-Sisi handily defeat Mousa Mostafa Mousa — the sole challenger who hasn't been jailed or intimidated into dropping out.

The backdrop: Sisi, the former minister of defense and commander-in-chief of the Egyptian Armed Forces, led a military coup to topple President Mohamed Morsi in 2013. He formally came to power in 2014 after winning 96% of the vote in the presidential election, but has since seen his popularity wane under deteriorating economic conditions and an oppressive human rights record.

SaveSave story

Where Trump's steel and aluminum trade war will hit first

Note: Includes only products under the "Iron & Steel & Ferroalloy" and "Alumina & Aluminum & Processing" NAICS commodity classifications. Data: Census Bureau; Chart: Chris Canipe and Lazaro Gamio / Axios

The Trump administration has begun imposing tariffs on imports of steel and aluminum, but several countries are exempted temporarily until May 1, as shown in the chart above. The administration may still apply quotas on exempted countries to prevent a flood of foreign steel and aluminum in the U.S. market, per the White House.

Why it matters: After railroading past a number of his advisors, Trump announced the tariffs on imports of steel (at 25%) and aluminum (at 10%) earlier this month, citing national security concerns. But with the exemption noted above, the tariffs won't carry major bite, at least to start.