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Image: Twitter

Doctors are the latest group to use Twitter to make the case for gun control, going viral with pictures graphically showing the impact of gun violence on U.S. society.

Driving the news: The mass response comes after the NRA tweeted that doctors should "stay in their lane" as a response to a paper released by the American College of Physicians. Doctors seized on the NRA tweet, responding with bloody photos and a variety of hashtags, including #ThisIsMyLane, #ThisIsOurLane and #ThisisEveryonesLane.

What they're saying:

  • Among the early rebuttals to the NRA was this tweet from forensic pathologist Judy Melinek: "Do you have any idea how many bullets I pull out of corpses weekly? This isn’t just my lane. It’s my f---ing highway." She expanded in an essay for Vox.
  • General surgery resident Lauren Nosanov: "Hey @NRA, they say if you want to understand someone’s perspective, you should walk a mile in their shoes. Just be prepared, because ours are covered in blood."
  • Surgery resident Danielle Kay: "Dear @NRA , Until you’re covered in blood and pronounce someone dead in the trauma bay, or told a mother that her child is dead, or sewed someone’s scalp together so their family doesn’t have to see their brain matter, please don’t tell me what my lane is."

Why it matters: The doctors are following a well-trodden path in trying to use social media to try to break through the perennial legislative logjam on gun control. The Parkland students and parents who have lost children to shootings have also achieved powerful viral messages. However, none of these efforts has yet succeeded in getting Congress to act.

Our thought bubble: Beyond the substantive arguments about how to end gun violence, the hashtag campaign also raises questions about how Twitter and other platforms will handle disturbing content.

  • If outraged health care professionals up the ante and show increasingly gruesome images, the platforms may feel they have to step in and draw lines.
  • But displaying the outcome of gun incidents in all their bloody horror is the whole point of the campaign.

Go deeper: Doctors are sharing gruesome photos of what it's like to treat gun violence victims (BuzzFeed)

Go deeper

The Biden protection plan

Joe Biden announces his first run for the presidency in June 1987. Photo: Howard L. Sachs/CNP/Getty Images

The Joe Biden who became the 46th president on Wednesday isn't the same blabbermouth who failed in 1988 and 2008.

Why it matters: Biden now heeds guidance about staying on task with speeches and no longer worries a gaffe or two will cost him an election. His staff also limits the places where he speaks freely and off the cuff. This Biden protective bubble will only tighten in the months ahead, aides tell Axios.

Bush labels Clyburn the “savior” for Democrats

House Majority Whip James Clyburn takes a selfie Wednesday with former President George W. Bush. Photo: Patrick Semansky-Pool/Getty Images

Former President George W. Bush credited Rep. James Clyburn with being the "savior" of the Democratic Party, telling the South Carolinian at Wednesday's inauguration his endorsement allowed Joe Biden to win the party's presidential nomination.

Why it matters: The nation's last two-term Republican president also said Clyburn's nod allowed for the transfer of power, because he felt only Biden had the ability to unseat President Trump.

GOP research firm aims to hobble Biden nominees

Alejandro Mayorkas. Photo: Joshua Roberts/AFP via Getty Images

The Republican-aligned opposition research group America Rising is doing all it can to prevent President Biden from seating his top Cabinet picks.

Why it matters: After former President Trump inhibited the transition, Biden is hoping the Republican minority in Congress will cooperate with getting his team in place. Biden hadn't even been sworn in when America Rising began blasting opposition research to reporters targeting Janet Yellen and Alejandro Mayorkas.