John Wilcox / AP

Two Massachusetts teenagers were texting when one of them expressed his willingness to take his own life. And when Conrad Roy III called his girlfriend Michelle Carter, now 20, right before he did, she encouraged him to go through with it. Subsequent text messages from Carter revealed she didn't tell him not to do it, nor did she contact anyone else — including his parents. Carter was convicted with involuntary manslaughter yesterday for her cell phone communications with her friend, per NYT, and it set a legal precedent.

Why it matters: This manslaughter charge, brought upon someone who wasn't physically there when another took his life, raises the question of whether words or social media comments can be grounds for murder convictions moving forward.

What they're saying: "Will the next case be a Facebook posting in which someone is encouraged to commit a crime?" Nancy Gertner, a former federal judge and Harvard Law professor, told NYT.

Go deeper

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Politics: The swing states where the pandemic is raging — Ex-FDA chief: Pence campaigning after exposure puts others at risk.
  2. Health: 13 states set single-day case records last week — U.S. reports over 80,000 new cases for second consecutive day.
  3. Business: Where stimulus is needed most.
  4. Education: The dangerous instability of school re-openings.
  5. World: Restrictions grow across Europe.
  6. Media: Fox News president and several hosts advised to quarantine.
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Bond investors see brighter days

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U.S. government bonds could breakout further after yields on the benchmark 10-year Treasury note ticked up to their highest since early June last week.

But, but, but: Strategists say this move is about an improving outlook for economic growth rather than just inflation.

Erica Pandey, author of @Work
6 hours ago - Economy & Business

The dangerous instability of school re-openings

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Schools across the country have flip-flopped between in-person and remote learning — and that instability is taking a toll on students' ability to learn and their mental health.

The big picture: While companies were able to set long timelines for their return, schools — under immense political and social strain — had to rush to figure out how to reopen. The cobbled-together approach has hurt students, parents and teachers alike.