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Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens prepares to take part in a training exercise during a visit to the St. Louis City Fire Academy. Photo: Jeff Roberson / AP

Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens (R), has rappelled into a bull-riding rodeo, crawled through dirt in an obstacle course and entered a burning building with firefighters, AP's Summer Ballentine and Margaret Stafford report:

"The 43-year-old Greitens — the nation's second-youngest state executive [New Hampshire's Chris Sununu is 7 months younger] — revels in the attention, posting videos of his action adventures on Facebook."

More on Greitens' exploits:

  • "In one feat of strength, Greitens visited an indoor rock climbing business and easily scaled two walls as media cameras rolled. Greitens was at the veteran-owned business to announce an initiative to eliminate all start-up business fees for veterans in Missouri."
  • "Other exploits include leading runs with military members [and] climbing 110 flights of stairs in memory of 9/11."
  • "He was a boxer in college and has a black belt in Taekwondo. A former Navy SEAL officer, he was once chlorine-gassed in a suicide bomb attack in Iraq. He returned to service three days later."
  • "Greitens was elected in 2016 with no prior experience in public office. He typically wakes up between 5 and 6 a.m. to run on local trails or do strength training at the Missouri State Highway Patrol gym."

Go deeper: St. Louis Post-Dispatch, "Greitens has cultivated a hard-charging persona in office, but his policy record is a mixed bag."

Go deeper

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

In photos: The Biden and Harris inauguration

President Biden and first lady Jill Biden watch a fireworks show on the National Mall from the Truman Balcony at the White House on Wednesday night. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

President Biden signed his first executive orders into law from the Oval Office on Wednesday evening after walking in a brief inaugural parade to the White House with First Lady Jill Biden and members of their family. He was inaugurated with Vice President Kamala Harris at the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday morning.

Why it matters: Many of Biden's day one actions immediately reverse key Trump administration policies, including rejoining the Paris Agreement and the World Health Organization, launching a racial equity initiative and reversing the Muslim travel ban.

Republicans pledge to set aside differences and work with Biden

President Biden speaks to Sen. Mitch McConnell after being sworn in at the West Front of the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday. Photo: Erin Schaff-Pool/Getty Images

Several Republicans praised President Biden's calls for unity during his inaugural address on Wednesday and pledged to work together for the benefit of the American people.

Why it matters: The Democrats only have a slim majority in the Senate and Biden will likely need to work with the GOP to pass his legislative agenda.

The Biden protection plan

Joe Biden announces his first run for the presidency in June 1987. Photo: Howard L. Sachs/CNP/Getty Images

The Joe Biden who became the 46th president on Wednesday isn't the same blabbermouth who failed in 1988 and 2008.

Why it matters: Biden now heeds guidance about staying on task with speeches and no longer worries a gaffe or two will cost him an election. His staff also limits the places where he speaks freely and off the cuff. This Biden protective bubble will only tighten in the months ahead, aides tell Axios.