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Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan (R) was unable to get federal authorization to deploy his state's National Guard to the U.S. Capitol until two hours into a siege on the building by a pro-Trump mob, he told CNN's "State of the Union" on Sunday.

Why it matters: Videos of the attack show Capitol and D.C. police largely overwhelmed by the crowd, which featured a mix of rioters wearing zip ties, body armor and weapon holsters and unarmed participants. Five people, including a Capitol police officer, died as a result of the riot, according to officials.

What he's saying: "We immediately sent police assistance, immediately called up the National Guard. It's a little bit of a tricky situation. In most cases, one governor could send his national guard into another state to help another one. But in D.C., only the Defense Department can do that," Hogan said, noting that he was unaware of what circumstances at the Pentagon or the White House contributed to the delay.

  • "Our guard mobilized and was ready, but we couldn't actually cross over the border into D.C. without the OK, and that was quite some time," he said. "Eventually, I got a call from Ryan McCarthy, the secretary of the army, asking if we could come into the city. ... We were just waiting for that call."

Of note: D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser (D) renewed a long-standing call for Washington to become the nation's 51st state after the siege on the Capitol.

Go deeper

Pelosi: Trump could be "accessory" to murder over deadly insurrection

Photo: Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

President Trump could be an "accessory" to murder in regards to the deadly Jan. 6 riots at the Capitol, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi told MSNBC Tuesday night.

Why it matters: Trump faced intense criticism after a crowd of his supporters breached the Capitol and broke into chambers, including Pelosi’s office. Five people died as a result of the insurrection.

Mike Allen, author of AM
23 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Biden-Harris, Day 1: What mattered most

President Joe Biden and first lady Dr. Jill Biden arrive at the North Portico of the White House. Photo: Alex Brandon-Pool/Getty Images

The Axios experts help you sort significance from symbolism. Here are the six Day 1 actions by President Biden that matter most.

Driving the news: Today, on his first full day, Biden translates his promise of a stronger federal response to the pandemic into action — starting with 10 executive orders and other directives, Caitlin Owens writes.

Read: Pete Buttigieg's opening statement ahead of confirmation hearing

Pete Buttigieg, President Biden's nominee to be secretary of transportation, in December. Photo: Kevin Lamarque/AFP via Getty Images

Pete Buttigieg, President Biden's nominee to lead the Transportation Department, will tell senators he plans to prioritize the health and safety of public transportation systems during the pandemic — and look to infrastructure projects to rebuild the economy — according to a copy of his prepared remarks obtained by Axios.

Driving the news: Buttigieg will testify at 10 a.m. ET before the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation. He is expected to face a relatively smooth confirmation process, though GOP lawmakers may press him on "green" elements of Biden's transportation proposals.