Updated May 20, 2018

"60 Minutes" takes aim at Google's search "monopoly"

A Google billboard in Bangalore, India. Photo: Manjunath Kiran/Getty Images

U.S. authorities have let Google build a monopoly in internet search that some critics believe is illegal, CBS News' "60 Minutes" reported Sunday night.

Why it matters: A lot of tech insiders joked over the past couple of months that Google was relieved to hand its "domineering tech behemoth" crown to Facebook after the Cambridge Analytica scandal. That reprieve for the search giant may be ending now.

In the "60 Minutes" report, well-known Google critics — including antitrust lawyer Gary Reback and Yelp CEO Jeremy Stoppelman — make the case that Google is a monopoly gatekeeper that uses its power over search to promote its own businesses and smother competitors.

  • The CBS show suggests that the 2011 FTC investigation of Google fizzled out in 2013 thanks to lobbying by Google, and that more recent scrutiny from the European Union's chief antitrust authority, which has fined Google $2.7 billion, won't be as easy to duck.

But, but, but: The "60 Minutes" report is largely a rehash of familiar complaints against Google from longstanding opponents.

  • As "60 Minutes" reminded viewers: "Most people love Google." In the U.S., successful antitrust action depends on proving harm to consumers — and that's been challenging with Google.

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Supreme Court to hear Philadelphia case over same-sex foster parents

Photo: Daniel Slim/AFP via Getty Images

The Supreme Court agreed Monday to hear a high-profile case that could reshape the bounds of First Amendment protections for religion.

Why it matters: The direct question in this case is whether Philadelphia had the right to cancel a contract with an adoption agency that refused to place foster children with same-sex couples. It also poses bigger questions that could lead the court to overturn a key precedent and carve out new protections for religious organizations.

Why Apple may move to open iOS

Photo illustration: Jakub Porzycki/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Apple may finally allow iPhone owners to set email or browsing apps other than Apple's own as their preferred defaults, according to a Bloomberg report from last week.

The big picture: Customers have long clamored for the ability to choose their preferred apps, and now Apple, like other big tech companies, finds itself under increased scrutiny over anything perceived as anticompetitive.