Google, Facebook get scammed

Virginia Mayo / AP

Google and Facebook were subject of a phishing scam worth over $100 million, Fortune reports. The Justice Department mysteriously announced last month that two "multinational tech companies" wired a Lithuanian criminal (since arrested) over $100 million after he forged invoices and corporate stamps that appeared to be from the tech company executives.

What they're saying: In a statement, Facebook told Axios it recovered "the bulk of the funds" shortly after the incident. Google says they detected and reported the fraud and "recouped the funds."

Why it matters: The fact that two of the largest, most sophisticated technology companies can fall victim to a phishing scam of this scale proves that the entire Internet ecosystem has a long way to go in creating a safe and protected environment. Axios recently highlighted some of the cybersecurity risks newsrooms are facing in the Internet age.

What's next

⚖️ Live updates: Opening arguments begin in Trump impeachment trial

The second day of the Senate impeachment trial of President Trump will see a full day of opening arguments from Democratic House impeachment managers.

What to watch for: Democrats now have 24 hours — spread out over three days — to take their time to lay out their case against the president's alleged abuse of power and obstruction of Congress. It'll also allow them to highlight gaps that could be filled out by additional witnesses and documents from the administration.

This post will be updated with new developments as the trial continues.

Go deeperArrowJan 21, 2020 - Politics

Axios Dashboard

Keep up with breaking news throughout the day — sign up for our alerts.

America's homelessness crisis isn't going away

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

If the opioid epidemic was the top issue plaguing American cities in the last five years, the most urgent problem of the next five is homelessness, a group of American mayors told reporters in D.C. this week.

Why it matters: Homelessness in the U.S. was on the decline after 2010, but it started to increase again in 2016 — and without moves to address the affordable housing crisis driving the issue, we can expect it to keep getting worse, experts say.

Go deeperArrow2 hours ago - Cities