Feb 17, 2017

GM, Lyft to roll out self-driving cars in 2018

The General Motors-Lyft self-driving car partnership could finally be seeing the light of day in 2018, according to a report from Reuters citing anonymous sources. The companies will roll out the fleets in several states.

In January 2016, GM announced a $500M investment in Lyft as well as a partnership to work together on self-driving cars. Shortly after, GM acquired self-driving car startup Cruise for close to $1 billion, which is also planning its own test program with Lyft later this year.

"It is our goal to operate a pilot in a major city this year that will permit consumers to enjoy, for the first time, a Lyft in an autonomous vehicle," government relations VP Joseph Okpaku told the Committee on Energy and Commerce on Friday, adding that the company has been working on self-driving cars on its own and with "trusted partners, such as General Motors." A GM spokesperson declined to comment.

The competition: GM is in a race against an increasing number of companies developing self-driving technology, including automakers like Ford and Tesla, as well as tech companies like Uber and Waymo, which recently spun out of Google.

The data: It's still difficult to tell how well companies are progressing on the development of their respective technologies, even based on data they report to the DMV, as The Information recently noted. While the data shows that Cruise's cars are among the top performers, the companies self-report the data and could be omitting certain results.

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Mass shooting in Milwaukee: What we know so far

Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett in 2012. Photo: John Gress/Corbis via Getty Images

Six people died in a shooting at the Molson Coors Brewing Company in Milwaukee Molson Coors on Wednesday, including the 51-year-old gunman, Mayor Tom Barrett told reporters at an evening press conference with local police.

Details: All of the victims worked at the brewery complex, as did the shooter who died of "an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound, police confirmed in a statement late Wednesday.

Go deeperArrowUpdated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus updates: U.S. probes case with no clear links, virus hits more countries

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins, the CDC, and China's Health Ministry. Note: China numbers are for the mainland only and U.S. numbers include repatriated citizens.

The CDC said Wednesday "astute" U.S. clinicians found the novel coronavirus in a person who did not recently return from a foreign country nor knowingly have contact with anyone infected, as six more countries reported their first cases.

The big picture: COVID-19 has killed more than 2,800 people and infected over 82,000 others. The number of new cases reported outside China exceeded those inside the country for the first time on Tuesday, the WHO said Wednesday. South Korea has the most, with 1,595 infections confirmed by Wednesday night. Europe's biggest outbreak is in Italy, where 453 cases have been confirmed.

Go deeperArrowUpdated 2 hours ago - Health

WHO official leads criticism of Trump's coronavirus response

President Trump with members of the new coronavirus task force, including Vice President Mike Pence at the White House on Wednesday. Photo: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

Dr. Ezekiel Emanuel, special advisor to the director general of the World Health Organization, told MSNBC Wednesday he found "most" of what President Trump said at his briefing on the novel coronavirus "incoherent."

The big picture: As the number of confirmed cases reaches 60 in the U.S., the top health professional — who was a health policy adviser in the Obama administration — is among several leading figures, in particular, Democrats, to criticize the president for his response to the outbreak.

Go deeperArrow2 hours ago - Health