Welcome back to today's Global Threats Roundup, the latest on this week's threats around the world, brought to you by Axios' Shannon Vavra. (Catch up on last week's debut here.) Check out our Apple News channel for the latest smart brevity on politics, tech, business, science and the future of work, and sign up here for our free newsletters.

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Updated 25 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

  1. Politics: Trump says if Biden's elected, "he'll listen to the scientists"Herd immunity claims by top Trump adviser are "pseudoscience," infectious-disease expert says.
  2. Map: 38 states, D.C. see surge in cases.
  3. Health: Coronavirus hospitalizations are on the rise — Fauci says he's "absolutely not" surprised Trump got coronavirus.
  4. Business: Consumer confidence surveys show Americans are getting nervousHow China's economy bounced back from coronavirus.
  5. Sports: We've entered the era of limited fan attendance.
  6. Education: Why education technology can’t save remote learning.
Dion Rabouin, author of Markets
3 hours ago - Economy & Business

The Fed is starting to question its own policies

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Several officials at the Fed are beginning to worry about asset bubbles and excessive risk-taking as a result of their extraordinary policy interventions, James Politi writes for the Financial Times, citing interviews with multiple Fed presidents and members of the Board of Governors.

Details: Some are now pushing for "tougher financial regulation" as concerns grow that monetary policy is "encouraging behavior detrimental to economic recovery and creating pressure for additional bailouts."

5 hours ago - Technology

Why education technology can’t save remote learning

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The coronavirus-sparked shift to widespread remote work has been generally smooth because most modern offices were already using a raft of communication, collaboration and administrative tools. Remote learning has faced a much rougher transition.

Why it matters: Even the best technology can't eliminate the inherent problems of virtual schooling. Several key technological stumbling blocks have persisted in keeping remote learning from meeting its full potential, experts tell Axios.

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