The Petya ransomware attack occurred in June 2017. Photo: Alexander Ryumin/TASS via Getty Images

"Cyberwarfare and populism are some of the top risks that could threaten global stability and financial markets in the years ahead, investors and policymakers warned at the annual Milken Institute Global Conference," Reuters' Anna Irrera reports from Beverly Hills.

Yes, but (and this was true at Davos, too): "Ironically, the mood [at the conference] was so positive that some speakers worried about excessive optimism."

  • Tom Barrack, "founder and executive chairman of Colony Northstar, said cybersecurity was his greatest concern because 'if the system itself is hacked or breaks or causes trauma, I am not sure what happens.'"
  • House Foreign Affairs Chair Ed Royce (R-Calif.) said "it’s been many years since we’ve done anything effective" against "Russian weaponization of information."
  • Peter Mandelson, a former European trade commissioner and British Labour minister: "My black swan is politics, politics in the West, which is getting bust ... And bust politics ... generates populist nationalist pressures on government and regulators, draws them more into the economy."

Go deeper

There's little consensus on TikTok's specific national security threat

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

TikTok has become a Rorschach test for how U.S. politicians view China, with little consensus on the specifics of its threat to homeland security.

The big picture: Much of what D.C. fears about TikTok is fear itself, and that's reflected in President Trump's executive order to ban the app by Sept. 20 if it's not sold by parent company ByteDance — alongside another focused on Chinese messaging app WeChat and its parent company Tencent.

U.S. sanctions Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam

Photo: Anthony Kwan/Getty Images)

The Treasury Department on Friday placed sanctions on Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam, following months of tension as she has allowed continued overreach by Beijing to subvert Hong Kong's autonomy.

Why it matters: It's the toughest sanction yet imposed on China for its destruction of Hong Kong’s relatively free political system.

GM's high-stakes electric move

The Cadillac Lyriq. Image courtesy of Cadillac

Cadillac on Thursday unveiled the Lyriq, the luxury brand's first all-electric model and GM's first consumer electric vehicle unveil since the Chevy Bolt several years ago.

Why it matters: It's the first reveal by GM of an electric vehicle that will use the company's new modular platform and Ultium battery system — technologies meant to underpin the 20 electric vehicles that GM plans to launch by 2023.